Elementary Reading List

 

Books about PERSISTING

Adler, David A. Lou Gehrig: the Luckiest Man. Harcourt Brace, 1997. A chronicle of the man as an athlete, as a man, and as someone with a terminal disease.

Adler, David. A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman. Holiday House, 1992. Biography of the woman who escaped from slavery to become famous as a conductor on the Underground Railroad.

Adler, David. A Picture Book of Helen Keller. Holiday House, 1990. A biography of the woman who overcame her handicaps of being both blind and deaf at the same time.

Aesop. The Tortoise and the Hare.

Anderson, Janet S. Sunflower Sal. Whitman, 1997. Unable to quilt, Sal finds her talents elsewhere.

Anno, Mitsumasa. The Fisherman and His Wife & The Four Clever Brothers. Philomel, 1993. Grimm Brothers’ tales combined with Mr. Fox’s highly unusual interpretation of them.

Armstrong, Jennifer. Hugh Can Do. Crown Publishing, 1992. Hugh goes to seek his fortune in the city, but first he must pay the toll-taker at the bridge.

Arnold, Caroline. Stone Age Farmers Beside the Sea. Clarion, 1997. Persistence, patience, and persevering takes to unravel a prehistoric village.

Avi. The Barn. Orchard Books, 1994. In an effort to carry out their father’s last request, Ben, his brother and sister construct a barn.

Auch, Mary Jane. Peeping Beauty. Holiday House, 1993. Poulette falls into the clutches of a hungry fox, who exploits her desire to become a great ballerina.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. With the help of friends, Mickey prepares to compete in the most important pool championship of his life.

Birdseye, Tom. Airmail To the Moon. Holiday House, 1988. When Ora Mae’s tooth disappears, she sets out to find the thief and send him “airmail to the moon.”

Blake, Robert J. Akiak: a Tale From the Iditarod. Philomel Books, 1997. Akiak the sled dog perseveres after being injured during the Iditarod sled dog race.

Borden, Louise. The Little Ships: the Heroic Rescue at Dunkirk in World War II. McElderry, 1997. A young English girl and her father use their fishing boat to rescue Allied and British troops trapped by Nazis.

Brown Don. Alice Ramsey’s Grand Adventure. Houghton Mifflin, 1997. Alice’s story of traveling from New York to San Francisco.

Browne, Eileen. No Problem. Candlewick Press, 1993. Mouse’s friends use persistence in putting together the pieces that come in a box as a birthday gift.

Burton, Virgina Lee. Katy and the Big Snow. Houghton, 1971. Geoppolis is under a blanket of snow and has to persist until a red crawler tractor saves the day.

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. Houghton, 1967. Mike Mulligan proves that, although outdated, his steam shovel is still useful.

Chodenko, Gennifer. Moonstruck: the True Story of the Cow who Jumped Over the Moon. Hyperion Books, 1997. The horse doubts that the cow will jump over the moon but offers and admiration when the persistent bovine accomplishes that feat.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. What writing requires is dedication and patience and the help supplied by friends, family, editors, designers, and printers.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (Series). The humorous adventures of Ramona, as she deals with life and her family problems.

Cleaver, Vera. Where the Lilies Bloom. Lippincott, 1969. A girl struggles to keep her family together after the death of their father.

Clements, Andrew. Frindle. Simon and Schuster, 1996. Nick Allen invents a new word and quickly loses control.

Cowley, Joy. The Mouse Bride. Scholastic Books, 1995. A little mouse on a search, makes the most important discovery of all, it is she who holds the key to her own destiny.

DeGross, Monalisa. Donovan’s Word Jar. HarperCollins, 1995. When Donovan’s word collection in fills up, he finds a special way to give words away.

dePaola, Tomie. Now One Foot, Now the Other. Putnam, 1980. When grandfather suffers a stroke, Bobby teaches him to walk, just as his grandfather had once taught him.

Dorris, Michael. Sees Behind Trees. Hyperion Books for Children, 1996. A native boy with poor vision journeys with and old warrior.

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Some Smug Slug. HarperCollins, 1996. A smug slug persists in ignoring the others around it.

Ernst, Lisa Campbell. Duke, the Diary Delight Dog. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Darla doesn’t want a dog around, but Duke persists to convince her that she is his home.

Ferry, Beth. Stick and Stone.

Fleischman, Sid. The Abracadabra Kid. Greenwillow, 1996. An autobiography of growing up.

Fleischman, Sid. The Whipping Boy. ABC-Clio, 1989. A prince and his whipping boy have adventures when they inadvertently trade places after becoming involved with dangerous outlaws.

Gackelbush, Dick. Poppy, The Panda. Clarion, 1984. Katie can’t find the right item for her toy panda to wear and her mother comes up with the perfect solution.

Galdon, Paul. Little Red Hen. Clarion, 1973. The little red hen finds none of her lazy friends willing to help her plant, harvest, or grind wheat into flour.

George, Jean. My Side of The Mountain. Dutton, 1988. A young boy tells of the year he spent living alone in the Catskill Mountains including his persistence to survive.

George, Twig C. A Dolphin Named Bob. HarperCollins, 1996. A sick dolphin is nursed back to health and later brings its child to show to the people who cared for it.

Gillette, J. Lynett. Dinosaur Ghosts: a Mystery of Coelphysis. Dial Books, 1996. Explores scenarios by scientists to explain the remarkable dinosaur exploration made in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico.

Goss, Linda. Frog Who Wanted to be a Singer. Orchard Books, 1996. A frog who had a desire to sing with the birds.

Greene, Carol. Martin Luther King, Jr: a Man Who Changed Things. Children’s Press, 1989. A biography of the and civil rights leader who helped African Americans win battles for equal rights in the United States.

Haddix, Margaret Peterson. Running Out of Time. Simon & Schuster, 1995. Jessie must save her village from a diptheria epidemic in 1840.

Hearne, Betsy. Seven Brave Women. Greenwillow, 1997. Brave women who left their imprint on the world.

Hines, Anna Grossnickle. Maybe a Band-Aid Will Help. Dutton, 1984. Trying to get Mama to fix a broken doll takes a lot of persistence.

Jeffreys, Oliver. Stuck.

Kellogg, Steven. Johnny Appleseed: a Tall Tale. Morrow, 1988. Presents the life of Johnny Appleseed, describing his love of nature.

King, Martin Luther. I Have a Dream. Scholastic, 1997. An illustrated edition of Dr. King’s speech.

Kipling, Rudyard. Rikki Tikki Tavi. Creative Education, 1988. Life in the jungle, featuring cobras and a mongoose.

Krull, Kathleen. Lives of the Athletes. Harcourt,1997. Athletes’ stories, showing persistence in how they keep trying through wins and losses.

Lasky, Kathryn. Librarian Who Measured the Earth. The Little, Brown & Co., 1994 The life’s work of Eratosthenes.

Lester, Julius. Sam and the Tigers. Dial Books, 1996. Relates what happens when a boy named Sam perseveres over several tigers that want to eat him (a retelling of Little Black Sambo).

Levine, Ellen. The Tree That Would Not Die. Scholastic, 1995. For nearly five hundred years the tree persevered and became a meeting place for the first people and was known as “Treaty Oak.”

Martin, Bill. Knots on a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. Boy-Strength-of-Blue-Horses and his grandfather reminisce about the young boy’s life.

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Viking, 1971. The life of Homer Price, including when he and his pet skunk capture four bandits.

McDermott, Gerald. Arrow To the Sun: A Pueblo Indian Tale. Viking, 1974. The Pueblo Indian tale which explains how the spirit of the Lord of the Sun was brought to the world of men.

Medearis, Angela Shelf. The Ghost of Sifty Sifty Sam. Scholastic Press, 1997. What would it take to stay in a haunted house overnight with a hungry ghost?

Miletsky, Jason. Ricky the Rock that Couldn’t Roll.

Miller, Pat. Squirrel’s New Year’s Resolution.

Mitchell, Barbara. Waterman’s Child. Lothrop, 1997. Fishermen and their families throughout the generation on Chesapeake Bay.

Nodset, Joan L. Go Away Dog. HarperCollin, 1997. Friendly dog want to stay no matter how hard the little boy tries to get rid of him.

Palatini, Margie. Moostache. Hyperion, 1997. Getting your mustache under control can be hard work.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends time in the wilderness with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother.

Piper, Walter. The Little Engine That Could. Platt & Munk, 1961. The Little Engine tries to pull a stranded train over the mountain.

Raschka, Chris. Mysterious Thelonius. Orchard, 1997. The life and works of pianist composer Thelonius Monk.

Raven, Margot Theis. Angels in the Dust. BridgeWater, 1997. Living in Oklahoma, and surviving the Dust Bowl pneumonia.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1969. A newly-captured monkey named George gets into continual trouble.

Robison, Nancy. On the Balance Beam. Whitman and Company, 1978. Andrea’s dream of becoming an gymnast is threatened by her own impulsiveness and a jealous member of her gym team.

Rohmer, Harriet, ed. Just Like Me. Children’s Press, 1997. Self-portraits by fourteen artists.

San Souci, Robert. The Talking Eggs. Dial, 1989. A folk tale in which kind Blanche, following the instructions of an old witch, gains riches, while her greedy sister gets nothing.

Shea, Pegi Deitz. New Moon. Boyd Mills Press, 1996. A child looks for the moon on a dark night.

Silverman, Erica. Don’t Fidget a Feather. MacMillian, 1994.
Their contest to decide who is the champion of champions almost has a disastrous ending.

Silverman, Erica. Mrs. Peachtree’s Bicycle. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Elderly Mrs. Peachtree persists in her desire to learn to ride a bicycle.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. The love between a boy and a tree continues into his old age.

Slobodkina, Esphyr. Caps for Sale.

Soto, Gary. Chato’s Kitchen. Putnam & Sons, 1995. Chato the cat prepares all kinds of food.

Spires, Ashley. The Most Magnificent Thing.

St. George, Judith. Betsy Ross: Patriot of Philadelphia. Holt, 1997. Story of Betsy Ross and the American flag.

Steig, William. Brave Irene. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1986. Irene encounters adventures as she delivers a beautiful gown her mother made to the duchess.

Steig, William. The Toy Brother. HarperCollins, 1996. A boy and his brother come to appreciate each other.

Tanaka, Shelley. On Board the Titanic. Hyperion/Madison, 1996. Seventeen-year-old Jack explores the Titanic before experiencing the sinking of the giant ocean liner.

Towle, Wendy. The Real McCoy. Scholastic, 1993. A biography of the Canadian-born African American who studied engineering in Scotland and patented over fifty inventions.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Bad Day at Riverbend. Houghton Mifflin, 1995. When Sheriff Hardy investigates town of Riverbend, and finds that the town has become part of a child’s coloring book.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Two bored and restless children find more excitement than they bargained for.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Charlotte, Wilbur the pig’s friend helps him not become the farmer’s dinner.

Wulffson, Don L. The Kid Who Invented the Popsicle. Cobblehill, 1997. Stories about inventions and their origins, with some surprises.

 

Books about MANAGING IMPULSIVITY

Bancroft, Catherine. That’s Philomena. Simon & Schuster, 1995. Philomena hears her brothers and sisters calling her “Philomeany,” she devises a plan to remind them that she is a nice big sister after all.

Bang, Molly. Dawn. Mulberry, 1983. A Japanese folktale in which a shipbuilder marries a woman who makes him promise never to look at her while she weaves sails for him.

Bateman, Teresa. The Ring of Truth. Holiday, 1997. When Patrick lies, he is given a ring that makes him tell the truth.

Berenstain, Stanley. Berenstain Bears (Series). Random House. The Berenstain Bears solve many problems as a family and as individuals.

Birdseye, Tom. Airmail To the Moon. Holiday, 1988. Ora Mae’s tooth that she was saving for the tooth fairy disappears,and she sets out to find the thief and send him, “airmail to the moon.”

Brown, Marc Tolon. Arthur’s Computer Disaster. Little, Brown and Company, 1997. Arthur disobeys by playing his favorite game on mother’s computer, which leads to a lesson in taking responsibility for one’s actions.

Browne, Eileen. No Problem. Candlewick Press, 1993. Mouse’s friends take turns assembling the pieces that come in a box as a birthday present.

Buehner, Caralyn. Fanny’s Dream. Dial Books, 1996. Fanny Agnes dreams of marrying a prince, but her fairy godmother doesn’t show up, she decides on a local farmer instead.

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. Houghton, 1967. Mike Mulligan proves that his steam shovel is still useful.

Byars, Betsy. The Blossoms and the Green Phantom. Dell Publishing, 1987. Junior Blossom created the ultimate invention – the Green Phantom. It’s big, black, and it’s beautiful! All it needs is the secret ingredient.

Byars, Betsy. The Eighteen Emergency. Viking, 1973. When the toughest boy in school swears to kill him, Mouse finds little help from friends and prepares for his emergency alone.

Byars, Betsy. The T.V. Kid. Viking, 1976. A young boy plunges with all his imagination into the world of television.

Cameron, Eleanor. That Julia Redfern. Dutton, 1982. Family loss and other occurrences cannot dampen for long the spirits of the irrepressible Julia.

Christopher, Matt. The Spy on Third Base. Little, Brown, 1988. A player is anxious about whether or not to help his team by using his special skills.

Clanton, Ben. Rex Wrecks It!

Cleary, Beverly. The Mouse and the Motorcycle. Morrow, 1965. The profile of a boy and a little mouse who wants to ride his toy motorcycle.

Dahl, Roald. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Knopf, 1973. Five children lucky enough to have an entry ticket into Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory take advantage of the situation.

DeClements, Barthe. Nothing’s Fair in Fifth Grade. Viking, 1981. A class, repelled by the overweight new student, finally learn to accept him.

Doyle, Brian. Spud…. (stories) Groundwood, 1996. Keeping one’s mouth shut is hard to do.

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Some Smug Slug. HarperCollins, 1996. A smug slug persists in ignoring the others around it.

Henkes, Kevin. Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. Greenwillow, 1996. Lilly loves school, especially her teacher, but she does something for which she is sorry.

Hillman, Janet. Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Mimosa, 1990. The story about Goldilocks and the three bears.

Hutchins, Pat. Little Pink Pig. Greenwillow, 1994. Little pig lags behind at bedtime and his mother asks the other animals for help in finding him.

Kasza, Keiko. Don’t Laugh, Joe! G.P.Putnam & Sons, 1997. Mother Possum’s son cannot play dead with laughing, and Mother is worried.

Levine, Arthur. The Boy Who Drew Cats. Dial, 1993. A young boy’s love for drawing cats gets him into trouble and leads him to an experience.

Lindberg, Becky Thoman. Thomas Tuttle, Just In Time. Albert Whitman & Co., 1994. Thomas has many problems working on his special projects.

Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking. Viking, 1978. Pippi, a wonder girl, lives alone although she is only nine.

Lindgren, Astrid. The Runaway Sleigh Ride. Viking, 1984. Elizabeth gets into trouble when she hides on the back of a sleigh and is taken for a long ride.

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Viking, 1973. Six episodes in the life of Homer Price, including one about a doughnut machine on the rampage.

Meddaugh, Susan. Martha Calling. Houghton Mifflin, 1994. The family takes Martha the talking dog along for a vacation that Martha won from the radio.

Milne, A. A. Winnie the Pooh. Dutton, 1988. The adventures of Pooh, Piglet, Owl, Tigger, and Eeyore.

Norton, Mary. The Borrowers. Harcourt, 1986. Miniature people who lived in an old country house are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. After a plane crash, Brian spends fifty-four days in the wilderness with only the aid of a hatchet given to him by his mother.

Reiss, Johanna. The Upstairs Room. Crowell, 1972. A Dutch Jewish girl describes the years she spent in hiding in the upstairs bedroom of a farmer’s house during World War II.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1969. A newly-captured monkey named George gets into continual trouble.

Robison, Nancy. On the Balance Beam. Whitman, 1978. Andrea’s dreams are threatened by her own hastiness.

Seuss, Dr. Dr. Seuss (Series). Random House. This assortment of rhymes and silly humor is amusing to all ages.

Schwartz, Amy. Begin at the Beginning. Harper & Row, 1983. Sara must paint a picture for the second grade art show, and worries until she discovers the best place to begin.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. The love between a boy and a tree continues through the years and into his old age.

Spinelli, Jerry. Maniac Magee. Scholastic, 1990. He wasn’t born with the name Maniac Magee but when his parents died and his life changed so did his name.

Stanley, Diane. Woe is Moe. Putnam, 1995. Moe’s new job brings him money, travel, and prestige – so why is he lonely and miserable?

Wells, Rosemary. Max and Ruby’s Midas: Another Greek Myth. Dial, 1995. Ruby tries to stop her younger brother from eating sweets by reading him an altered version of the story of King Midas.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Charlotte helps Wilbur the pig not become the farmer’s dinner.

Wolff, Patricia Rae. The Toll-Bridge Troll. Harcourt, 1995. A troll tries to prevent Trigg from crossing the bridge only to be outwitted by the boy’s riddles.

 

Books about LISTENING WITH UNDERSTANDING AND EMPATHY

Alexander, Lloyd. The House Gobbaleen. Dutton, 1995. Unhappy over his bad luck, Tooley ignores his cat’s warnings and invites a greedy man into his house.

Bancroft, Catherine. That’s Philomena. Simon & Schuster, 1995. When Philomena hears her brothers and sisters calling her “Philomeany,” she devises a plan to have them recognize that she is a nice big sister.

Bang, Molly. Wiley And the Hairy Man. MacMillian, 1976. Wiley outwits the hairy creature that dominates the swamp near his home.

Banks, Lynne R. Indian In the Cupboard. Doubleday, 1980. A boy receives a plastic Indian, a cupboard, and a key and finds himself immersed in an adventure when the Indian comes to life.

Blume, Judy. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. Dell, 1972. Peter finds his demanding brother an increasing problem.

Bowdish, Lynea. Living With My Stepfather is Like Living With a Moose. Farrar, 1997. Matt has a hard time finding anything good about his new stepfather.

Brett, Jan. The Hat. G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1997. When Lisa hangs clothes in the sun to air them out, the hedge-hog, ends up wearing a stocking on his head.

Bunting, Eve. I Am The Mummy Heb-Nefert. Harcourt Brace & Co., 1997. A Mummy retells her past life as a royal in the court of ancient Egypt.

Burgess, Melvin. The Bay and the Fly Pie. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Three homeless teens stumble upon a kidnapped baby and hopes to exchange her for money to improve their lives.

Byars, Betsy. Summer Of the Swans. Viking, 1970. A teenage girl gains new insight when her mentally challenged brother gets lost.

Cameron, Eleanor. That Julia Redfern. Dutton, 1982. Family loss and other occurences cannot dampen the spirits of irrepressible Julia.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. Dedication, patience and the help supplied by friends, family, editors, designers, and printers are what writing requires.

Christopher, Matt. Spy On Third Base. Little, Brown & Company, 1988. A player does not know about whether or not to help his team by using his knack for knowing where the batter is going to hit the ball.

Cleary, Beverly. Dear Mr. Henshaw. Morrow, 1983. In his letters to his favorite author, Leigh reveals his problems in the world.

Cleary, Beverly. Mouse And the Motorcycle. Morrow, 1965. The adventures of a boy and a little mouse who wants to ride his toy motorcycle.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (Series). Ramona and the problems in her family life.

Dahl, Roald. Matilda. Viking, 1988. Matilda’s family believes her only talent is as a scapegoat for everything that goes wrong.

DeClements, Barthe. Nothing’s Fair in Fifth Grade. Viking, 1981. A class, repelled by the overweight new student, finally learns to accept him.

Doerrfeld, Cori. The Rabbit Listened.

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Some Smug Slug. HarperCollins, 1996. A Smug Slug refuses to listen to others to his own dismay.

Getz, David. Floating Home. Holt, 1997. How would an astronaut draw a house?

Granowsky, Alvin. Bears Should Share. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. Juxtaposes the traditional tale with Goldilocks’ side of the story.

Granowsky, Alvin. Brainy Bird Saves the Day. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of Henny Penny and her friends with a retelling in which the animals’ more careful analysis of the situation helps them avoid a sad ending.

Granowsky, Alvin. Giants Have Feelings, Too. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of Jack and the beanstalk with a retelling from the giants’ point of view.

Granowsky, Alvin. Help Yourself, Little Red Hen. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. Juxtaposes the tale of the little red hen with the friends’ side of the story.

Granowsky, Alvin. Just a Friendly Old Troll. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of the three billy goats with a retelling in which the troll tells his side of the story.

Green, Alison. Kindness.

Greenstein, Elaine. Mrs. Rose’s Garden. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Mrs. Rose grows a prize crop of vegetables guaranteed to win at the County Fair, she is inspired to a generous act.

Gregory, Kristina. Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie: The Oregon Trail Diary of Hattie Campbell. Scholastic, 1997. Hattie chronicles her family’s travels in her journal.

Hall, Donald. I Am the Dog / I Am the Cat. Dial, 1994. Life from the points of view of a dog and a cat.

Havill, Juanita. Sato and the Elephants. Lothrop, Lee and Sheperd, 1993. While working on an ivory carving, Sato comes to understand the plight of the endangered elephants.

Haywood, Carolyn. Summer Fun. Morrow, 1986. A collection of ten stories, all of which take place during the summer.

Henry, Marguerite. Misty of Chincoteague. Macmillian, 1975. Two youngsters’ determination to own a Chincoteague pony is increased when the Phantom and her colt are rounded up for the yearly auction.

Howard, Arthur. When I Was Five. Harcourt, 1996. A young boy’s world from his point of view.

Johnson, Angela. Tell Me a Story, Mamma. Orchard, 1989. A girl and her mother remember all the girl’s stories about her mother’s childhood.

Konigsburg, E. L. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Frankweiler. Antheneum, 1967. Two children run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where their ingenuity enables them to live a life of luxury.

Kuskin, Karla. The Philharmonic Gets Dressed. Harper, 1982. The orchestra members get ready for a show.

Lindgren, Astrid. The Runaway Sleigh Ride. Viking, 1984. Elizabeth gets into trouble when she hides on the back of a sleigh and is taken for a long ride.

Lionni, Leo. An Extraordinary Egg. Knopf, 1994. Jessica becomes friends with an animal who emerges from an egg she brought home, thinking it will be a chicken.

MacLachlan, Patricia. Sarah, Plain and Tall. Harper & Row, 1984. When their father invites a bride to live with them, Caleb and Anna are fascinated by their new mother and hope that she will stay.

Martin, Bill. Knots On a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. Boy-Strength-of-Blue-Horses and his grandfather reminisce about the young boy’s birth, his first horse, and an exciting horse race.

McDermott, Gerald. Arrow To the Sun: A Pueblo Indian Tale. Viking, 1974. The Pueblo Indian myth which explains how the spirit of the Lord of the Sun was brought to the world of men.

McGhee, Holly M. Come with Me.

McGraw, Eloise. The Moorchild. Simon & Schuster, 1996. A changeling learns her true identity and attempts to find the human child whose place she had been given.

Mendez, Phil. The Black Snowman. Scholastic, 1989. Through magical powers, a black snowman comes to life and helps Jacob discover the beauty of his black heritage.

Miller, Zeitlow. Be Kind.

Montgomery, Sy. Becoming a Good Creature.

Newman, Marjorie. Mole and the Baby Bird.

Nichol, Barbara. Beethoven Lives Upstairs. Orchard, 1994. Christoph shares his feelings via letter to his uncle.

Noble, Trinka Hakes. The Day Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash. Dial, 1980. Jimmy’s boa constrictor wreaks havoc on the class trip.

O’Brien, Robert. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH. Atheneum, 1971. A widowed mouse visits the rats whose former imprisonment in a laboratory made them wise and long-lived.

Paterson, Katherine. Bridge To Terabithia. Crowell, 1977. The life of a boy in Virginia expands when he becomes friends with a newcomer who meets an untimely death trying to reach his hideaway.

Paterson, Katherine. Jacob Have I Loved. Crowell, 1980. Feeling deprived all her life by her twin sister, Louise finally begins to find her identity.

Paterson, Katherine. Jip: His Story. Lodester Books, 1996. On a Vermont poor farm during 1855-1856, Jip learns his identity and comes to understand how he arrived at this place.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. After a plane crash, Brian spends fifty-four days in the wilderness with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother.

Peet, Bill. Big Bad Bruce. Houghton Mifflin, 1977. Bruce never picks on anyone his own size until he is diminished in more than one way by a small but very independent witch.

Prelutsky, Jack. There’s a New Kid On the Block. Greenwillow, 1984. Poetry about school life and friendship.

San Souci, Robert. The Hired Hand. Dial, 1997. Sam’s lazy son learns how to treat people from the hired hand.

San Souci, Robert. The Talking Eggs. Dial, 1989. A tale in which kind Blanche, following the instructions of an old witch, gains riches, while her greedy sister gets nothing.

Schotter, Roni. Nothing Ever Happens on 90th Street. Orchard, 1997. Eva sits on her stoop and learns a lot about her neighborhood.

Scieszka, Jon. True Story of the 3 Little Pigs/ by A. Wolf; as told to Jon Scieszka. Viking Kestrel, 1989. The wolf’s version of the classic pigs’ story.

Seldon, George. The Cricket in Time Square. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1987. With the help of a mouse and a cat, a cricket improves business at the newsstand run by Mario.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. The love between a boy and a tree continues through his old age.

Smith, Doris Buchanan. A Taste of Blackberries. Crowell, 1973. A boy recounts his efforts to adjust to the death of his best friend.

Sonenklar, Carol. Bug Boy. Holt & Co., 1997. Someone gives Charlie a “Bug-a-View”, a magic device that turns him into different bugs.

Spinelli, Eileen. Somebody Loves You Mr. Hatch.

Steig, William. The Toy Brother. HarperCollins, 1996. A boy learns to understand how brothers are truly like.

Stolz, Mary. A Ballad of the Civil War. HarperCollins, 1997. Twin brothers share all except their beliefs about slavery.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Bad Day at Riverbend. Houghton Mifflin, 1995. When Sheriff Hardy investigates the afflictions of Riverbend, he finds that the village has become part of a child’s coloring book.

Viorst, Judith. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Atheneum, 1972. Recounts the events of a day when everything goes wrong for Alexander.

Wallace, Karen. Imagine You Are a Crocodile. Henry Holt & Co., 1996. A crocodile takes you deep into the world of animals.

Well, Rosemary. Max and Ruby’s Midas: Another Greek Myth. Dial, 1995. Ruby tries to stop her brother Max from eating so much sweets by reading him an adjusted version of the story of King Midas.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Charlotte the Spider helps her friend Wilbur the pig not to become the farmer’s dinner.

White, E. B. The Trumpet of the Swan. Harper & Row, 1970. Understanding reading and writing is not enough for a voiceless Trumpeter Swan, and his determination to learn to play a stolen trumpet takes him far.

Wolff, Ferida. A Weed Is a Seed. Houghton, 1996. Things looked at from two different views.

Wood, Don. Heckedy Peg. Harcourt, 1987. A mother saves her children from Heckedy Peg, an evil witch who has turned them into different kinds of food.

Woodtor, Dee Parmer. Big Meeting. Antheneum, 1996. Family travel to attend “Big Meeting” at the Bethel A. M. E. Church, where they worship and get together.

Yep, Laurence. The Khan’s Daughter. Scholastic Books, 1997. In this Mongolian folktale, a simple shepherd must pass three tests in order to marry the Khan’s exquisite daughter.

Yolen, Jane. Beneath the Ghost Moon. Little, Brown and Company, 1994. Mice battle mean-hearted creepy-crawlies to protect their home.

 

Books about COOPERATIVE THINKING— SOCIAL INTELLIGENCE

Agell, Charlotte. Dancing Feet. Harcourt Brace, 1994. Feet, hands, eyes, etc. all around the world doing the same activity in a somewhat different manner.

Best, Cari. Top Banana. Orchard, 1997. Who is the “top banana” and what is sharing?

Blos, Joan W. Old Henry. Mulberry Books, 1987. The neighbors can’t tolerate the mess on Henry’s property, until they manage to run him out of town and find out how much they miss him.

Bunting, Eve. The Blue and the Gray. Harcourt Brace, 1996. Overlooking an unmarked Civil War battlefield makes two new neighborhood children realize the historical backgrounds behind their being friends.

Bunting, Eve. Smoky Night. Harcourt Brace, 1994. Forced to seek shelter helps a neighborhood realize just how much their ethnic backgrounds really depend on each other.

Cowen-Fletcher, Jane. It Takes a Village. Scholastic, 1994. When her brother Kokou disappears, Yemi realizes that it does take a whole community to raise a child.

Dooley, Norah. Everybody Cooks Rice. Carolrhode, 1991. Searching for her brother, Carrie learns that every ethnic background serves rice for dinner in their own special traditions.

Factor, June. Summer. Viking, 1987. As summer approaches, a family eagerly awaits its arrival.

Fleischman, Paul. Seedfolks. HarperCollins, 1997. A group of people from different backgrounds transform a trash-filled inner city lot into a beautiful garden.

Florian, Douglas. A Beach Day. Greenwillow, 1990. As the season arrives, one family describes how they enjoy the days of summer.

Flourney, Valerie. The Patchwork Quilt. Dial Books, 1985. Tanya helps her grandmother made a quilt from old scrap material.

Fox, Mem. Whoever You Are. Harcourt, 1997. Children all over the world, same inside, different outside.

Gammell, Stephen. Is That You, Winter? Harcourt, 1997. Even old man winter realizes his importance and get happy.

Greenstein, Elaine. Mrs. Rose’s Garden. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Mrs. Rose shares her very large vegetables with her neighbors

Hamanaka, Sheila. All the Colors of the Earth. Morrow, 1994. Children are essentially the same all over the world.

Hoopes, Lyn Littlefield. The Unbeatable Bread. Dial, 1996. Bread unites all in a fabulous feast.

Komaiko, Leah. My Perfect Neighborhood. Harper & Row, 1990. Walking through her neighborhood has an everlasting effect on a young girls attitude towards it.

Leventha, Debra. What Is Your Language? Dutton, 1994. That is the question as a young traveler journeys from country to country.

Lewin, Ted. Fair. Greenwillow, 1997. Sights, smells and tastes of the county fair.

Lewin, Ted. Market. Lothrop, 1996. Visit the great markets of the world.

Low, William. Chinatown. Holt, 1997. Chinatown, a city within a city, as seen through the eyes of a boy.

MacLachlan, Patricia. All the Places to Love. HarperCollins, 1994. As a young boy describes all the places he loves, he includes the visit to his grandparent’s farm.

McNaughton, Colin. There’s an Awful Lot of Weirdos in Our Neighborhood. Candlewick,1997. Poems about eccentric characters.

Nolen, Jerdine. Harvey Potter’s Balloon Farm. Lothrop, 1989. Harvey Potter grows balloons and all wonder how.

Numeroff, Laura. The Chicken Sisters. HarperCollins, 1997. The chicken sisters are finally accepted by her neighbors after they drive the wolf away.

Paulsen, Ruth Wright. Worksong. Harcourt Brace, 1997. People doing all kinds of work.

Polacco, Patricia. Chicken Sunday. Philomel, 1992. Through her own actions towards others Mrs. Walker receives special gifts of friendship from many people of many ethnic backgrounds.

Polacco, Patricia. My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother. Simon & Schuster, 1994. Life with a brother can be rough and tough at times.

Polacco, Patricia. Pink and Say. Philomel, 1994. Coming from different family on different sides of the Civil War didn’t stop these boys from being the best of friends.

Rylant, Cynthia. Poppleton. Blue Sky, 1997. The adventures of Poppleton as he goes about his daily life in his community.

Saltzberg, Barney. Mrs. Morgan’s Lawn. Hyperion, 1993. Mrs. Morgan doesn’t want anything to happen to her beautiful lawn, so thinking she can stop a tragedy, she confiscates all the neighbors’ sporting balls.

Scheffler, Ursel. Stop Your Crowing, Kasimar. Carolrhoda, 1988. Trying to silence a loud rooster, the neighbors appeal to the authorities, but receive a result they didn’t have in mind.

Schotter, Roni. Nothing Ever Happens on 90th Street. Orchard Books, 1997. When trying to write about things that happen on her neighborhood block, Eva gets a lot of advice and action.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. The relationship and love between a boy and a tree through the years.

Spiner, Stephanie. Born to Be Wild. Harper Trophy, 1997. Cooperation is needed in order to save a pet bunny.

Spohn, Kate. Broken Umbrellas. Viking, 1994. A homeless woman wasn’t homeless always, how did she end up like this?

Sweeney, Joan. Me On the Map. Crown, 1996. How a child’s room, house, town, state and country become part of a map.

Tamar, Erika. The Garden of Happiness. Harcourt, 1996. A garden planted by the neighborhood’s people.

Viorst, Judith. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Antheneum,1972. Alexander experiences the most horrible day of his life.

Williams, David. Grandma Essie’s Covered Wagon. Knopf, 1993. Looking for a better life and a way of living, Grandma describes what it was like crossing the United States in a covered wagon.

Yolen, Jane. Miz Berlin Walks. Philomel, 1997. Wonderful stories told by an elderly woman as she walks around the blocks of her home.

Zelver, Patricia. The Wonderful Towers of Watts. Tambourine, 1994. In his Watts neighborhood, an Italian immigrant builds unusual towers.

 

Books about FLEXIBILITY IN THINKING

Alexander, Lloyd. The House Gobbaleen. Dutton, 1995. Unhappy over bad luck, Tooley ignores his cat’s warning and invites a greedy little man into his home.

Anno, Mitsumasa. The Fisherman And His Wife & The Four Clever Brothers. Philomel, 1993. Brothers Grimm tales combined with Mr. Fox’s highly unusual interpretation of them.

Armstrong, Jennifer. Hugh Can Do. Crown Publishers, Inc., 1992. Hugh wants to seek his fortune, but first he must find a way to pay the toll-taker.

Bang, Molly. Wiley And the Hairy Man: adapted from An American Folk Tale. Macmillan, 1976. Wiley outwits the hairy creature that dominates the swamp near his home.

Barrett, Judy. Animals Should Definitely Not Wear Clothing. Atheneum, 1984. Pictures of animals wearing clothes show why this would be ridiculous for them.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. Mickey prepare to compete in the most important pool championship of his life, with the aid of his friends.

Birdseye, Tom. Airmail to the Moon. Holiday, 1988. Ora Mae sets out to find the thief who stole the tooth meant for the tooth fairy and send him “airmail to the moon.”

Blume, Judy. Freckle Juice. Four Winds, 1971. Andrew buys Sharon’s freckle recipe for fifty cents.

Brett, Jan. Comet’s Nine Lives. G.P. Putnam, 1996. Comet the cat uses eight of nine lives.

Brett, Jan. The Hat. G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1997. When Lisa hangs her woolen clothes in the sun, the hedge-hog, ends up wearing a stocking on his head.

Brooke, William J. Teller of Tales. HarperCollins, 1994. Traditional tales told with a twist.

Browne, Eileen. No Problem. Candlewick Press, 1993. Mouse’s friends use their mental skills in putting together the pieces that come in a box as a birthday gift.

Buehner, Caralyn. Fanny’s Dream. Dial Books, 1996. Fanny Agnes dreams of marrying a prince, but when her fairy godmother doesn’t show up, she decides on a local farmer instead.

Burns, Marilyn. The Greedy Triangle. Scholastic, 1994. Unhappy with its shape, a triangle keeps asking the shape shifter to add more lines and angles until it doesn’t know what end is up.

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel. Houghton, 1967. Mike Mulligan proves that his steam shovel is still useful.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. What writing requires are dedication, patience and the help supplied by friends, family, editors, designers, and printers.

Climo, Shirley. The Irish Cinderlad. HarperCollins, 1996. A Cinderella story with a boy as the protagonist.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (Series). The humorous adventures of Ramona, as she deals with life.

Conrad, Pam. The Rooster’s Gift. HarperCollins, 1996. A young rooster believes he is responsible for the sun rising.

Cowley, Joy. The Mouse Bride. Scholastic Books, 1995. A little mouse goes out on a search, and she makes the most important discovery of all, it is she who holds the key to her own destiny.

Dahl, Roald. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Knopf, 1973. Five children lucky enough to have an entry ticket into Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory take advantage of the situation.

DeGross, Monalisa. Donovan’s Word Jar. HarperCollins, 1994. Donovan’s word collection fills up, and he finds a special way to give his words away.

Demi. One Grain of Rice. Scholastic, 1997. A reward of one grain of rice doubles day by day when a selfish raja is outwitted by a clever village girl.

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. Creative Education, 1990. A miser learns the real meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and warn him of his future.

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Dinorella: A Prehistoric Fairytale. Hyperion, 1997. An alliterative story of classic Cinderella.

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Livingston Mouse. HarperCollins, 1996. A mouse in search of China discovers that he must choose a new home that does not affront his senses.

Ehlich, Amy. Parents In the Pigpen, Pigs In the Tub. Dial Books, 1993. The farm animals insist on moving into the house, so the family decides to move into the barn.

Fitzgerald, John. The Great Brain (Series). The resourceful, and sometimes inventive adventures of T.D. and his brother J.D. in Mormon, Utah in the 1890s.

Fleischman, Paul. Bull Run. HarperCollins, 1993. A variety of characters describe the events, and disillusionment of the first battle of the Civil War.

Friedman, Aileen. The King’s Commissioners. Scholastic, 1994. The king learns some new ways of counting.

Gillette, J. Lynett. Dinosaur Ghosts: the Mystery of Coelophysis. Dial Books, 1996. Explore the different scenarios that explain the remarkable dinosaur exploration made in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico.

Givens, Terryl. Dragon Scales and Willow Leaves. G.P. Putnam, 1997. Twins Jonathan and Rachel see nothing the same way.

Goble, Paul. Iktomi and the Buzzard. Orchard, 1994. One more of Iktomi’s schemes, this time to fool a buzzard.

Granowsky, Alvin. Bears Should Share. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The traditional tale of the three bears using Goldilock’s side of the story.

Granowsky, Alvin. Brainy Bird Saves the Day. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of Henny Penny and her friends in which the animals’ more careful analysis of the situation helps them avoid a sad ending.

Granowsky, Alvin. Giants Have Feelings, Too. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of Jack and the beanstalk with a retelling from the giant’s point of view.

Granowsky, Alvin. Help Yourself, Little Red Hen. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of the little red hen with the friend’s side of the story.

Granowsky, Alvin. Just a Friendly Old Troll. Steck-Vaughn, 1996. The tale of the three billy goats with a retelling in which the troll tells his side of the story.

Griffin, Peni R. Switching Well. McElderry, 1993. Two girls in San Antonio, Texas, Ada in 1891 and Amber in 1991, magically trade places and try desperately to return to their own times.

Grimm, Brothers. Rapunzel. (retold by Amy Ehrlich). A gorgeous girl with extraordinarily long hair is imprisoned in a tall tower by an evil witch.

Grimm, Brothers. Rumpelstiltskin. (retold by Paul Zelinsky). A strange little man helps a girl spin straw into gold for the king.

Hahn, Mary D. The Gentleman Outlaw and Me-Eli: a Story of the Old West. Clarion, 1996. Disguised as a boy, twelve-year-old Eliza travels to Colorado in search of her father.

Handford, Martin. Where’s Waldo? Little, Brown, 1987. The reader follows Waldo and must try to find him in the illustrations of some of the crowded places he visits.

Harris, Joel Chandler. Brer Rabbit (Series). A collection of tales in which Brer Rabbit outwits his adversaries in order to ensure his family’s survival during the drought.

Howard, Arthur. When I Was Five. Harcourt, 1996. The world from a five year old view.

Hutchins, Pat. Shrinking Mouse. Greenwillow, 1997. Four animal friends notice that the size of objects seems to change depending on the location and movement of the viewer.

Isaacs, Ann. Swamp Angel. Dutton, 1994. Angelica saved settlers from the jaws of a fearsome bear.

Johnston, Tony. The Iguana Brothers. Scholastic, 1995. The Iguana brothers, eat flowers, pretend to be dinosaurs, and discover that they can be best friends.

Kasza, Keiko. Grandpa Toad’s Secrets. Putnam, 1995. Little Toad saves the day when a huge monster attacks.

Kehret, Peg. Earthquake Terror. Cobblehill, 1996. When earthquake strikes, Jonathan must find a way to save himself, his paralyzed sister and his dog.

Keller, Debra. The Trouble with Mister. Chronicles, 1995. Alex finds another way to have the dog he’s always wanted, even though his parents are against it.

Kimmel, Eric A. Anansi and… (stories) Holiday House.Stories of the clever spider and his tricks.

Kipling, Rudyard. Rikki Tikki Tavi. Creative Education, 1998. How the mongoose saves the family from the black cobras.

Kneen, Maggie. When You’re Not Looking: a Storytime Counting Book. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Readers are encouraged to use their imaginations and to find objects from one to ten in a series of illustrations.

Konigsburg, Elaine. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. Antheneum, 1967. Two suburban children run away from home and go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where their ingenuity enables them to live in luxury.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. A girl on a visit to her granddad feels that there is something out of the ordinary but can’t figure out what it is.

Lester, Julius. Sam and the Tigers. Dial Books, 1996. A boy named Sam matches wit with several tigers that want to eat him (a remake of Little Black Sambo).

Lewis, J. Patrick. Riddle-icious. Knopf, 1996. Try your hand at poems that will generally please anyone who likes a good rhyme and riddle.

Lionni, Leo. Frederick. Pantheum, 1967. Frederick the mouse dreams while his friends gather food. When winter arrives Frederick proves that he is a poet, not just a dreamer.

Lowell, Susan. Little Red Cowboy Hat. Holt, 1997. A Southwestern version of Little Red Riding Hood.

Martin, David. Little Chicken Chicken. Candlewick Press, 1996. An imaginative chicken uses string and stones to entertain her friends during a thunderstorm.

McKenzie, Ellen Kindt. The Perfectly Orderly House. Henry Holt, 1994. A woman builds a house with twenty-six rooms and keeps all her possessions in alphabetical order.

McKissack, Pat. Flossie and the Fox. Dial Books, 1986. A wily fox meets his match when he encounters a bold little girl who insists he proves he’s a fox before becoming frightened.

Mazer, Harry. The Dog in the Freezer. Simon & Schuster, 1997. Three novellas about the relationship between a boy and a dog.

Meddaugh, Susan. Hog Eye. Houghton, 1995. A young pig uses her ability to read to outsmart a wolf that intends to make her dinner.

Montgomery, Lucy. Anne of Green Gables. Grosset, 1983. Anne, an orphan, is sent to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a farm.

Montgomery, R. A. Choose Your Own Adventure (Series). Mystery problem solving stories.

Murpy, Stuart J. Divide and Ride. HarperCollins, 1997. Carnival rides and the teaching of division.

Polacco, Patricia. Aunt Chip and the Great Triple Creek Dam Affair. Philomel, 1996. How Aunt Chip saves the town when they forgot how to read.

Polette, Nancy. The Hole By the Apple Tree. Morrow, 1992. Harold’s imagination takes him on an adventure romp through the alphabet.

Reider, Katja. Snail Started It. North-South Books, 1997. Tale of a snail’s mishaps with various animals.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1969. A newly-captured monkey named George gets into continual trouble.

Root, Phyllis. Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble. Candlewick, 1996. Aunt Nancy only sees the good in everything, even when trouble comes.

Rotner, Shelly & Olivo, Richard. Close Closer Closest. Atheneum, 1997. Photos of everyday objects from three different viewpoints.

Sendak, Maurice. Where The Wild Things Are. Harper & Row, 1963. A naughty little boy sails to the land of the wild things where he becomes their king.

Shannon, George. Tomorrow’s Alphabet. Greenwillow, 1995. Think ahead, and you’ll enjoy this unusual alphabet book.

Scieszka, Jon. The Time Wrap Trio series. Viking. Adventures with space and time travels.

Shaw, Charles. It Looked Like Spilt Milk. Scholastic, 1989. It looked like spilt milk, but it wasn’t spilt milk. What was it?

Sierra, Judy. Wiley and the Hairy Man. Lodestar, 1996. Wiley outwits the conjuring Hairy Man.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. The love between a boy and a tree continues into his old age.

Simon, Seymou. Einstein Anderson, Science Sleuth. Viking, 1986. Wacky science phenomena and Adam is there to solve them.

Soto, Gary. Chato’s Kitchen. Putnam, 1995. Chato the cat prepares all kinds of food.

Souhami, Jessica. The Leopard’s Drum. Little, Brown and Company, 1995. Osebo has a fine, a huge, a magnificent drum, but he won’t let anyone else have it.

Spenelli, Eileen. Thanksgiving at the Tappletons’. HarperCollins, 1992. When misery chases every step of the preparations for the Thanksgiving dinner, they realize that there is more to Thanksgiving than turkey and trimmings.

Stanley, Diane. The Gentleman and the Kitchen Maid. Dial, 1994. Two paintings in a museum fall in love.

Stanley, Diane. Rumpelstiltskin’s Daughter. Morrow Books, 1997. Rumpelstiltskin’s daughter is more than a match for a greedy king who has cursed his entire kingdom.

Stoeke, Janet Morgan. Minerva Louise at School. Dutton, 1996. Minerva sees everything in her own way.

Stolz, Mary. A Ballad of the Civil War. HarperCollins, 1997. Different views of the war by two brothers.

Turkle, Brinton. Do Not Open. Dutton, 1981. Miss Moody and her cat find an intriguing bottle washed up on the beach. Should they ignore its “Do Not Open” warning?

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Two bored and restless children find more than they bargained for.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Two Bad Ants. Houghton, 1988. When two bad ants desert from their colony, they experience dangers which convinces them to return to their former safety.

Wallace, Barbara Brooks. Cousins In the Castle. Atheneum, 1996. A friend comes to Amelia’s aid when she finds herself the victim of a villain’s fiendish plans.

Wardlaw, Lee. Punia and the King of Sharks: a Hawaiian Folktale. Dial Books, 1997. Clever Punia, a fisherman’s son, finds different ways to trick the king and take his tasty lobsters away.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Charlotte the spider helps her friend Wilbur the pig not to become the farmer’s dinner.

Wolff, Patricia Rae. The Toll-Bridge Troll. Harcourt, 1995. Trigg, to cross the bridge on the way to school must outwit the Troll and does by using his riddles.

Wolff, Ferida. A Weed Is a Seed. Houghton, 1996. Things can be looked at in two different ways.

Wolkstein, Diane. Little Mouse’s Paintings. Morrow, 1992. Little Mouse creates a painting which looks like three different things to her three friends, all of whom find themselves in it.

Wyllie, Stephen. A Flea in the Ear. Dutton Children’s Books, 1995. A sly fox outwits a dog who has the job of protecting chickens, but then finds he can be outwitted as well.

Young, Ed. Lon Po Po: a Red Riding Hood Story from China. Philomel, 1989. Three sisters staying home are endangered by a ravenous wolf who is disguised as their grandmother.

Zolotow, Charlotte. William’s Doll. Harper & Row, 1972. Father gives William a basketball and a train but these do not ease his desire for a doll any less.

 

Books about METACOGNITION: AWARE OF YOUR OWN THINKING

Adler, David. Cam Jansen (series). Cam Jansen and his friends explore adventures in space.

Anno, Mitsumasa. The Fisherman And His Wife & The Four Clever Brothers. Philomel, 1993. Brothers Grimm tales combined with Mr. Fox’s highly unusual rendition of them.

Bancroft, Catherine. That’s Philomena. Simon & Schuster, 1995. When Philomena hears her brothers and sisters calling her “Philomeany,” she invents a plan to make them realize that she’s not so bad after all.

Banks, Lynne Reid. Indian In the Cupboard. Doubleday, 1980. A boy receives a plastic Indian, a cupboard, and a key for his birthday and finds he’s in an escapade.

Banyai, Istvan. Zoom. Viking, 1995. A picture book presents a series of scenes, each one from a picture farther away.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. With the help of his friends, Mickey prepares to compete in the most important pool championship of his life.

Ballairs, John. The House with the Clock in Its Walls. Dell, 1984. A boy goes to live with his magician uncle in a mansion.

Berry, James. Rough Sketch Beginning. Harcourt Brace, 1996. Artist’s thoughts and visions as he prepares a sketch for a painting.

Borden, Louise. The Little Ships: the Heroic Rescue at Dunkirk in World War II. McElderry, 1997. An English girl and her father use their fishing boat in a brave attempt to rescue Allied and British troops trapped by Nazi soldiers.

Bornstein, Ruth Lercher. That’s How It Is When We Draw. Clarion, 1997. Young artist’s feelings about drawing.

Browne, Eileen. No Problem. Candlewick Press, 1993. Mouse’s friends take turns putting together the pieces that come in a box as a birthday gift.

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. Houghton, 1967. Mike Mulligan proves that his steam shovel is still useful.

Carle, Eric. Flora and Tiger: 19 Very Short Stories About My Life. Philomel, 1997. Recollection of the author/illustrator about his childhood in Germany.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. What writing requires are dedication and patience, with the help supplied by friends, family, editors, designers, and printers.

Cleary, Beverly. Dear Mr. Henshaw. Morrow, 1983. In letters, Leigh reveals his problems in coping with all his troubles.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (series). The humorous adventures of Ramona, as she deals with life and her family problems.

Clements, Andrew. Frindle. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Nick Allen invents a new word, begins a chain of events and quickly loses control.

Cohen, Miriam. Starring First Grade. Greenwillow, 1985. Jim saves the performance when one of the key players gets stage fright.

Creech, Sharon. Chasing Redbird. HarperCollins, 1997. Family secrets and self truths on a farm in Kentucky.

Cushman, Karen. The Ballad of Lucy Whipple. Clarion Books, 1996. Lucy is distraught when her mother decides to move the family from Massachusetts to a small California mining town.

Dahl, Roald. James and the Giant Peach. Knopf, 1961. Fantasy about a boy and an extraordinary giant peach.

Dahl, Roald. My Year. Viking, 1994. Records and observations about nature, and memories of childhood by Mr. Dahl.

Dalgliesch, Alice. The Courage of Sarah Noble. MacMillan, 1954. A girl finds courage to go alone with her father to build a home in the wilderness and to live with the Indians.

Demi. Buddha Stories. Holt, 1997. Stories of moral and wisdom of Buddha.

Dixon, Franklin. The Hardy Boys (series). The Hardy sleuths are called in to solve mysteries.

Ehrlich, Amy. When I Was Your Age. Candlewick, 1996. Authors share stories of childhood.

Fitzhugh, Louise. Harriet the Spy. Dell Publishing, 1964. Harriet has a secret notebook which she fills with utterly honest jottings about the people she knows.

Gardiner, John. Stone Fox. Crowell, 1980. Willy hopes to pay backtaxes on his grandfather’s farm with the purse from a dog sled race he enters.

George, Jean Craighead. Julie of the Wolves. Harper & Row, 1972. An Eskimo girl gets lost on the Alaskan tundra and is befriended by a wolf pack.

Greenwald, Sheila. Rosy Cole: She Grows and Graduates. Orchard Books, 1997. While focusing entirely on gaining admittance to the posh Hilyard School next year, Rosy Cole neglects her friends and her talent until she finally discovers something about herself.

Gryski, Camilla. Cat’s Cradle, Owl’s Eyes. Morrow, 1984. Information for making string figures and gives step-by-step instructions.

Hahn, Mary Downing. Time For Andrew. Clarion Books, 1994. Spending the summer with his great-aunt, Drew is drawn eighty years into the past and trades places with his dead great-great-uncle.

Hansen, Joyce. I Thought My Soul Would Rise and Fly: The Reconstruction Era Diary of Patsy. Scholastic, 1997. Diary of a freed African American slave.

Havill, Juanita. Sato and the Elephants. Lothrop, Lee & Sheperd, 1993. While working on an ivory carving Sato comes to understand the plight of the endangered elephant.

Henkes, Kevin. Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. Greenwillow, 1996. Lilly loves school, especially her teacher, but when asked to leave her purse at home, she does something for which she is sorry.

Henkes, Kevin. Sun & Spoon. William Morrow, 1997. Adjusting and remembering the death of his grandmother, Spoon sets out to bring her memory back.

Hopkinson, Deborah. Birdie’s Lighthouse. Atheneum, 1997. Diary of lighthouse keeper’s daughter in the 1800s.

Howe, James. Bunnicula. Atheneum, 1979. Though scoffed at by Harold the dog, Chester the cat tries to warn his human family of a vampire.

Neasi, Barbara. Just Like Me. Childrens Press, 1984. Twins discover each other’s likes and dislikes.

Kasza, Keiko. Grandpa Toad’s Secrets. Putnam, 1995. Little Toad is the one who saves the day when a huge monster attacks.

Keene, Carolyn. Nancy Drew (series). Nancy goes up against and solves mysteries.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. A young girl on her visit to her granddad feels that there is something strange but can’t figure out what it is.

Lewis, J. Patrick. Riddle-icious. Knopf Books, 1996. Try your hand at poems that will generally please anyone who likes a good rhyme and riddle.

Martin, Bill. Knots on a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. Boy-Strength-of-Blue-Horses and his grandfather reminisce about the young boy’s life.

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Viking, 1971. The life of Homer Price, including when he and his pet skunk captured four bandits.

McGraw, Eloise. The Moorchild. Simon & Schuster, 1996. A changeling learns her true identity and attempts to find the human child whose place she had been given.

Milne, A. A. Winnie the Pooh. Dutton, 1988. The experiences of Pooh, Piglet, Owl, Tigger, and Eeyore.

Parrish, Peggy. Amelia Bedelia (series). A housekeeper causes a ruckus wherever she goes.

Paterson, Katherine. The Great Gilly Hopkins. Crowell, 1978. A foster child tries to cope with her longings and fears as she contrives against everyone who tries to be friendly.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. After a plane crash, Brian spends time in the wilderness with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother.

Rauls, Wilson. Where the Red Fern Grows. Bantam, 1961. A loving threesome, they ranged the dark hills and river bottoms of Cherokee country.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1969. A newly-captured monkey named George gets into continual trouble.

Silverstein, Shel. Light in the Attic. Harper & Row, 1981. A comprehensive collection of humorous poems.

Sobol, Donald. Encyclopedia Brown (series). America’s Sherlock Holmes finds solutions to puzzles.

Speare, Elizabeth. The Sign of the Beaver. Houghton, 1983. Left alone to guard the family’s wilderness home, a boy is desperate to survive until local Indians guide him with their skills.

Spivak, Dawnine. Grass Sandals: The Travels of Basho. Atheneum, 1997. Retelling of the travels of 17th century poet Basho.

Steig, William. The Toy Brother. HarperCollins, 1996. When one of the brothers shrinks the other thinks of how his father would handle the situation.

Stewart, Sarah. The Gardener. Farrar, Straus, 1997. Life in the city as seen though a little girls from her letters to her father.

Wallace, Barbara Brooks. Cousins in the Castle. Antheneum, 1996. A friend comes to Amelia’s rescue when she finds herself the victim of an evil villian’s fiendish plans.

Wolff, Patricia Rae. The Toll-Bridge Troll. Harcourt, 1995. Trigg needs to cross the bridge on the way to school only to be confronted by a troll whom he outwits with his riddles.

Yep, Laurence. The Khan’s Daughter. Scholastic Books, 1997. In this Mongolian folktale, a simple shepherd must pass three tests in order to marry the Khan’s beautiful daughter.

 

Books about STRIVING FOR ACCURACY AND PRECISION

Adler, David. Cam Jansen (series). Precision and Accuracy help Can Jansen solve unusual mysteries in this series of adventure books.

Banks, Lynn Reid. Indian In the Cupboard. Doubleday, 1980. After he receives a plastic Indian, a cupboard, and a key for his birthday, a nine-year-old boy finds he’s involved in an adventure when the Indian comes to life.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. Math genius, ten-year-old Mickey, prepares to compete in the most important pool championship of his life.

Browne, Eileen. No Problem. Candlewick Press, 1993. Not reading the instructions, Mouse and friends have problems putting together the pieces that come in a box as a birthday present.

Burns, Marilyn. The Greedy Triangle. Scholastic, 1994. A triangle keeps asking the local shape shifter to add more lines and angles until it doesn’t know which side is up.

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. Houghton, 1967. Although outdated, Mike Mulligan proves that his steam shovel is still useful.

Charlip, Remy. Arm in Arm. Tricycle Press, 1997 Tales of tongue twisters, verse and word games.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. What writing requires: patience, dedication, accuracy and precision.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (series). Ramona, an eight-year-old, deals with life and her family problems in a humorous way.

Clements, Andrew. Frindle. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Nick Allen invents a new word and begins a chain of events that moves beyond his control.

Cohen, Miriam. Starring First Grade. Greenwillow, 1985. When one of the key players in Jim’s first grade play gets stage fright, Jim saves the day.

Cyrus, Kurt. Tangle Town. Farrar, 1997. On this unusual day, the words are all twisted and so are their meanings.

DeGross, Monalisa. Donavan’s Word Jar. HarperCollins, 1994. Donavan keeps his word collection in a jar, things begin to happen when his jar is filled.

Demi. One Grain of Rice. Scholastic, 1997. One grain of rice doubles day by day into millions of grains of rice has the
selfish raja outwitted by a clever village girl.

Dixon, Franklin. Hardy Boys (series). The Hardy sleuths are called in to solve mysteries using their persistence skills.

Fitzhugh, Louise. Harriet the Spy. Dell Publishing, 1964. Harriet has a secret notebook, which she fills with honest jottings about her parents, her classmates, and her neighbors.

Fox, Mem. Possum Magic. Harcourt, 1990. Two Australian possums in search of magic that will make the invisible visible.

Galdone, Paul. The Magic Porridge Pot. Mifflin/Carion, 1976. What happens when the porridge pot runs amuck and produces too much food?

Gardiner, John. Stone Fox. Crowell, 1980. With the purse from a dog sled race he enters, Willy hopes to pay back taxes on his grandfather’s farm.

Geisert, Arthur. The Etcher’s Studio. Houghton, 1997. Grandfather and grandson work together.

Gillette, J. Lynett. Dinosaur Ghosts: a Mystery of Coehlophysis. Dial Books, 1996. Different scenarios put forth by scientists explaining the remarkable dinosaur exploration made in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico.

Gryski, Camilla. Cat’s Cradle, Owl’s Eyes. Morrow, 1984. Information for making string figures, step-by-step instructions for more than twenty figures.

Heller, Ruth. Behind the Mask: a Book about Prepositions. Grosset & Dunlop, 1995. Rhyming text exploring the subject of prepositions and how they’re used.

Hopkinson, Deborah. Birdie’s Lighthouse. Atheneum, 1997. Birdie assumes the responsibility of lighthouse keeper on the Maine coast in 1855.

Howe, James. Bunnicula. Atheneum, 1979. Chester the cat tries to warn his human family that their foundling baby bunny must be a vampire.

Jackson, Donna M. The Bone Detectives: How Forensic Anthropologists Solve Crimes and Uncover Mysteries of the Dead. Little Brown, 1996. A look into the world of forensic anthropology.

Keene, Carolyn. Nancy Drew (series). Nancy confronts and solves mysteries.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. A young girl on her weekly visit to her grandad feels that there is something out of the ordinary going on and persists to find out what it is.

Lewis, J. Patrick. Riddle-icious. Knopf Books, 1996. Twenty-eight poems that tickle and tease.

Livingston, Myra Cohn, ed. I Am Writing a Poem About… Simon & Schuster, 1977. Students write short poems, a game poetry book.

Manes, Stephen. Be a Perfect Person. Clarion, 1982. Finding a book in the library which promises to make him perfect in just three days, Milo knows his problems with family and classmates will be solved.

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Viking, 1943. Attention to detail will help Homer Price avoid disaster and excitement.

McNaughton, Colin. Making Friends with Frankenstein. Candlewick Press, 1994. Words and poems of silly, scary, and disgusting creatures.

Milne, A. A. Winnie the Pooh. Dutton, 1988. The adventures of Pooh, Piglet, Owl, Tigger and Eeyore.

Murphy, Stuart J. Betcha! HarperCollins, 1997. Estimating accurately can lead to rewards.

Norton, Mary. The Borrowers. Harcourt, 1986. Miniature people who are living in an old country house by borrowing things from the humans are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

Parrish, Peggy. Amelia Bedelia (series). A literal-minded housekeeper wreaks havoc wherever she goes.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1969. Newly-captured monkey George gets into continual trouble.

San Souci, Robert. The Talking Egg. Dial, 1989. A Southern folk tale in which kind Blanche follows an old witch’s instructions, gains wealth, while her greedy sister gets nothing.

Schotter, Roni. Nothing Ever Happens on 90th Street. Orchard Books, 1997. When Eva sits on her stoop trying to complete a school assignment by writing about what happens in her neighborhood, she gets a great deal of advice and action.

Shea, George. First Flight: the Story of Tom Tate & the Wright Brothers. HarperCollins, 1996. A boy named Tom Tate meets Orville and Wilbur Wright and witnesses the invention of the airplane in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

Simon, Seymour. Einstein Anderson, Science Detective. (series) Morrow, 1997. Brain teasers and game of witch as reader follow Einstein Anderson’s investigations.

Sobel, Donald. Encyclopedia Brown (series). America’s Sherlock Holmes finds solutions to problems.

Stanley, Diane. Leonardo Da Vinci. Morrow, 1996. The life and times of Leonardo Da Vinci.

Tanaka, Shelly. Discovering the Iceman. Hyperion, 1977. Exploration and explanation of the 5,300 year old mummy discovery.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Left on their own for an afternoon, two bored and restless children find more excitement than they bargained for.

Warner, Gertrude Chandler. The Boxcar Children. Whitman, 1983. Four orphans, two boys and two girls, set up housekeeping in an old boxcar.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Wilbur the pig, is upset when he discovers that he is to be the farmer’s dinner until his spider friend, Charlotte, decides to help him.

 

Books with A SENSE OF HUMOR

Alexander, Lloyd. The Fortune-Tellers. Dutton, 1992. Every future prediction that a fortune teller tells a carpenter comes true.

Allard, Harry. The Stupids Take Off. Houghton Mifflin, 1989. To keep from facing their obnoxious Uncle, the Stupids visit other relatives and notice the others are just as stupid as they are.

Allen, Jonathan. Mucky Moose. Macmillan, 1991. Mucky, the smelliest moose in the forest, has many advantages when trying to outwit a fierce wolf.

Allen, Jonathan. Who’s at the Door? Tambourine, 1993. A wolf tries all sorts of disguises determined to have the three pigs for dinner.

Barrett, Judith. Animals Should Definitely not Wear Clothing. Atheneum, 1984. A book showing how ridiculous animals would look if made to wear clothes.

Blume, Judy. Freckle Juice. Four Winds Press, 1971. A scheme to sell a freckle recipe is welcomed with open arms by Andrew, who would do anything to have freckles.

Blume, Judy. Fudge-a-mania. Dutton Children’s Books, 1990. Highlighted by Fudge’s many antics, Peter describes the family vacation.

Blume, Judy. The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo. Yearling, 1981. Being the middle child, Freddy hates it.

Blume, Judy. Super-Fudge. Dutton Books, 1980. Peter describes the highs and lows of having Fudge as his younger brother.

Blume, Judy. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. Dell/Yearling, 1972. Fudge seems too demanding with his ever increasing problems for his older brother Peter.

Brett, Jan. The Hat. Putnam and Sons, 1997. The animals confiscate Lisa’s clothes from the line and the hedgehog wears a stocking on his head.

Brittain, Bill. My Buddy, the King: a Novel. Harper & Row, 1989. After saving the king from choking, Tim Quilt and King Tokab become the best of friends.

Buting, Eve. Trouble on the T-Ball Team. Clarion, 1997. Everyone on the team is losing something, except Linda, what’s going on?

Byers, Betsy. Bingo Brown and the Language of Love. Puffin Books, 1989. Bingo Brown learns some hilarious lessons stumbling into maturity.

Cameron, Ann. Julian, Secret Agent. Random House, 1988. Deciding to be “crime busters,” Julian, Huey and Gloria find themselves in one adventure after another.

Choldenko, Gennifr. Moonstruck: The True Story of the Cow Who Jumped Over the Moon. Hyperion, 1997. Mother Goose got it all wrong when devoting only one line about the cow jumping over the moon.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona Quimby (series). The adventures of the Quimby family and Ramona’s humorous antics.

Conford, Ellen. A Case for Jenny Archer. Little, Brown and Company, 1988. After she is convinced that her neighbors are up to no good, Jenny becomes a mystery detective.

Conford, Ellen. Jenny Archer, Author. Little, Brown and Company, 1989. Using her considerable imagination, Jenny decides to enhance her own life by adding to her autobiography for her class assignment.

Dahl, Roald. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Knopf, 1973. After finding a “golden ticket” for entry into Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory, each of the five winners take advantage of the situation in their own way.

Dahl, Roald. Matilda. Viking, 1988. With Matilda’s practical jokes for sheer genius, her parents and friends don’t stand a chance.

Denim, Sue. The Dumb Bunnies Go to the Zoo. Scholastic, 1997. Another tale of the Dumb Bunnies and their silly adventures.

De Regeniers, Beatrice Schenk. What Can You do with a Shoe? McElderry, 1997. A game of silly questions and answers.

DeLuise, Dom. King Bob’s New Clothes. Simon and Schuster, 1996. A remaking of the fairy tale in which the King is convinced that he has new expensive invisible clothes that were especially made for him.

Dionetti, Michelle. Painting with Wind. Little, Brown and Company, 1996. Claudine’s mother is working as Vincent van Gogh’s housekeeper, but when the town turns against him, Claudine is deeply saddened.

Dragonwagon, Crescent. Bat in the Dining Room. Marshall Cavendish, 1997. A bat in the dining room, what could happen next

Egan, Tim. Burnt Toast on Davenport Street. Houghton Mifflin, 1997. Two dogs, for the most part content with the lives, find mischief when a fly grants Arthur three wishes.

Ehrlich, Amy. Parents in the Pigpen, Pigs in the Tub. Dial Books, 1993. When the animals decide that their routine life is too unbearable, they decide to trade places with the humans on their farm.

Fitzgerald, John D. The Great Brain (series). J. D. and his friends have many adventures as the Great Brain detectives solve several cases.

Fleischman, Sid. McBroom Tells a Lie. Little, Brown and Company, 1976. Determined to save their farm, a farmer and his wife use several unusual devices.

Freedman, Florence. It Happened in Chelm: a Story of the Legendary Town of Fools. Shapolsky Publishers, 1990. When their shops are robbed by bandits in the mythical town of Chelm, seven wise men are consulted.

Florian, Douglas. Bing, Bang, Boing. Harcourt Brace, 1994. Over 170 non-sense verses are comically illustrated.

Gardiner, John Reynolds. Top Secrets. Little, Brown and Company, 1984. Determined to do his science project, Allen is met with the disapproval of not only his parents but his science teacher as well.

Greenblat, Rodney Alan. Uncle Wizzmo’s New Used Car. Harper & Row, 1990. To pick out his new used car, Uncle Wizzmo makes his trip to Turnpike Larry’s.

Greenburg, Dan. Dr. Jekyll, Orthodontist. Grosset and Dunlop, 1997. Zack is overwhelmed when the Orthodontist that he is being treated from changes right before his eyes.

Greenwald, Sheila. Mariah Delany’s Author-of-the-Month Club. Little, Brown and Company, 1990. With disastrous results, Mariah invites several authors to her Author-of-the-Month Club.

Grimes, Nikki. It’s Raining Laughter. Dial, 1997. Poems about growing up with a sense of humor.

Hall, Lynn. Dagmar Schultz and the Angel Edna. Scribner Books, 1989. Dagmar is consulted by an angel with old-fashioned morals when she finally finds a boy in town who fills her boy-crazy thoughts.

Jackson, Alison. I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie. Dutton, 1997. When invited to dinner, the old lady eats and eats.

Jones, Diana Wynne. Stopping for a Spell: Three Fantasies. Greenwillow Books, 1993. Three hilarious stories will keep you in stitches.

Kellogg, Steven. Ralph’s Secret Weapon. Dial Books, 1983. When her nephew shows promise as a sea serpent charmer, Aunt Georgiana shows him a secret weapon.

Lattimore, Deborah Nourse. The Lady with the Ship on her Head. Harcourt Brace, 1990. Unaware that a small ship has sailed on her head, Madame Pompenstance competes in the annual Fancy Dress Ball anyway.

Lawlor, Laurie. Second-Grade Dog. Whitman and Sons, 1990. Disguised as a second-grader, the Mudheads’ dog, spends an adventurous day at school.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. Feeling that something is out of the ordinary, a young girl visiting her grandfather tries to figure it out.

Lester, Julius. Sam and the Tigers. Dial Books, 1996. Sam matches wits with some tigers who want to eat him. A retelling of Little Black Sambo.

Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking. Viking, 1978. At the age of nine and living on her own, Pippi has many funny adventures.

Lowery, Linda. Twist with a Burger, Jitter with a Bug. Houghton Mifflin, 1995. A humorous look at dancing is enhanced with colorful illustrations and rhyming texts.

McNaughton, Colin. There’s an Awful Lot of Weirdos in Our Neighborhood. Candlewick, 1997. Humor, poetry, and eccentric characters.

Macaulay, David. Why the Chicken Crossed the Road. Hougton Mifflin, 1987. A chain of hilarious events is set off simply by a chicken crossing the road.

Maguire, Gregory. Seven Spiders Spinning. Clarion, 1994. Seven deadly tarantulas frozen for thousands of years invade a contemporary classroom in rural Vermont.

Mahy, Margaret. Jam: a True Story. Joy Street Books, 1986. While trading places with his wife, Mr. Castle finds all the housework done, until a backyard tree gives him some ideas.

Mahy, Margaret. Raging Robots and Unruly Uncles. Overlook, 1993. The arrival of unruly robots convinces two parents that their two runaway children weren’t that bad after all.

Manes, Stephen. Be a Perfect Person in Just Three Days. Clarion Books, 1982. Milo, tired of having problems with his family and classmates, finds a book in the library that guarantees him perfection in three days.

Manes, Stephen. Make Four Million Dollars by Next Thursday! Bantam, 1991. Jason attracts curious people when he follows advice given him by the bizarre Dr. Silverfish in a get-rich-quick book.

Marshall, James. The Cut-Ups (series). The hilarious antics of the Cut-Ups will keep your funny bone in stitches with their adventures.

McCloskey, Robert. Burt Dow, Deep-Water Man. Viking, 1963. Catching a whale by the tale can lead to an unexpected adventure when an old fisherman tries first-aid using only a band-aid.

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Viking, 1971. A book containing six zany adventures in the life of Homer Price, including when he used a skunk to capture crooks.

McKay, Hilary. The Exiles. McElderry, 1992. Four sisters spend a wild summer with Grandma, who tries to break their reading habit with fresh air, but gets unexpected results.

Mitchell, Adrian. Baron All at Sea: More Adventures of Baron Munchausen. Philomel, 1987. Undertaking a perilous journey, Baron Munchausen helps aid a thousand Africans in returning to their homeland from a concert.

Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. The Healing of Texas Jake. Simon & Schuster, 1997. Texas Jake, the cat, is recuperating from injuries received by mastiff Bertram the Bad, and Texas Jake’s friends do everything to make him feel better.

Nixon, Joan Lowery. Fat Chance, Claude. Puffin Books, 1989. Meeting in the gold mining hills of Colorado, Shirley and Claude have some zany adventures.

Noble, Trinkle Hakes. Meanwhile Back at the Ranch. Dial Books, 1987. Amazing things happen to his wife on the ranch back home, while this bored rancher husband is in town.

O’Malley, Kevin. Velcome. Walker, 1997. Hilariously presented stories and jokes from around the campfire.

Palacco, Patricia. My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother. Simon and Schuster, 1994. After losing several competitive activities with her obnoxious brother, a young girl makes a wish on a falling star.

Palatini, Margie. Piggie Pie! Clarion Books, 1995. A witch flies to Old MacDonald’s farm for some pigs for her favorite recipe, but can’t find any.

Park, Barbara. Almost Starring Skinnybones. Knopf, 1988. Alex is convinced that he will be a star after winning a cat food essay contest, and is asked to create a commercial for national television.

Parrish, Peggy. Amelia Bedelia (series). The crazy antics of Amelia Bedelia as she turns her ordinary world into extraordinary.

Pinkwater, Daniel Manus. Aunt Lulu. Macmillan, 1988. After becoming bored from being a librarian, Aunt Lulu decides to move to Parsippany, New Jersey, with her sled and sled dogs.

Pinkwater, Daniel Manus. Guys from Space. Macmillan, 1989. On an outer space journey, a boy accompanies aliens as they discover amazing things about a planet with talking rocks.

Pinkwater, Daniel Manus. The Hoboken Chicken Emergency. Simon and Schuster, 1977. Arthur comes home with a 260 pound chicken for Thanksgiving instead of a turkey.

Pinkwater, Daniel Manus. The Muffin Fiend. Lee, Lothrop and Sheperd, 1977. A thief is stealing all the muffins in Europe, but Wolfgang Mozart and Inspector LeChat are determined to solve this zany case.

Protopopescu, Orel Odinov. The Perilous Pit. Green Tiger, 1993. A series of hilarious events happens when a girl named Katie tossed a peach pit over her shoulder.

Pulver, Robin. Mrs. Toggle’s Zipper. Four Wind Press, 1990. Everyone tries with little success to unstick the zipper on Mrs. Toggle’s coat.

Richler, Mordecai. Jacob Two-Two and the Dinosaur. Knopf, 1987. A small lizard grows enormously when brought home from Kenya.

Robertson, Keith. Henry Reed’s Baby-Sitting Service. Viking, 1966. Henry has hilarious baby-sitting jobs running a baby-sitting service, including a four-year-old boy, and once he had to care for a peacock.

Robertson, Keith. Henry Reed (series). The antics of Henry Reed keeps all in stitches as he has many hilarious adventures.

Robinson, Barbara. The Best School Year Ever. HarperCollins, 1994. The towns six horrible kids, the Herdmans, cause mischief throughout the school year.

Rockwell, Thomas. How to Eat Fried Worms. ABC-Clio, 1987. Can worms make a delicious meal? Two boys set out to prove they can.

Ross, Tony. Super Dooper Jezebel. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1988. While telling others how to behave, a little girl receives an unwelcome surprise.

Rylant, Cynthia. The Relative Came. Bradbury, 1985. The relatives come to visit and everyone has a wonderful time.

Sachar, Louis. Marvin Redpost: Kidnapped at Birth. Random House, 1992. Convinced by his looks that he can’t possibly be related to his parents, Marvin sets out to prove that he is really a lost prince from Shampoon.

Sachar, Louis. Sideways Stories from Wayside School. Avon, 1985. Hilarious stories about the Wayside School, which was built sideways with one classroom on each floor.

Sachar, Louis. Wayside School is Falling Down. Lee, Lothrop and Sheperd, 1989. Unforgettable stories from the Wayside School, where students learn to tango, face the dreaded Mushroom Surprise in the cafeteria, and study a hobo for show-and-tell.

Saunders, Susan. The Curse of the Cat Mummy. HarperTrophy, 1997. Touching the mummy’s nose, cat falls into a trance and disaster is everywhere.

Schwartz, Alvin. Tales of Trickery from the Land of Spoof. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1988. A variety of sources create a collection of hilarious tales for the reader.

Schwartz, Amy. The Lady Who Put Salt in Her Coffee. Harcourt Brace, 1989. A family is on an elaborate quest to make her coffee drinkable after Mrs. Peterkin accidentally uses salt instead of sugar.

Scieszka, Jon. Your Mother Was a Neanderthal. Viking, 1993. Finding themselves in the middle of prehistoric times, the Time Warp Trio learns that “rock” music has a whole new meaning.

Seuss, Dr. I am Not Going to Get Up Today! Beginner Books, 1987. Neither peas and beans nor the United States Marines can get a sleepy boy out of bed.

Smith, Lane. The Happy Hocky Family. Viking, 1993. Stories about the Hocky family and the antics of their cousin Stinky.

Smith, Robert Kimmel. Chocolate Fever. G. P. Putnam and Sons, 1972. Henry breaks out in brown bumps from eating too much chocolate, but they aid him in foiling some hijackers.

Sonenklar, Carol. Bug Boy. Holt, 1997. Bug lover Charlie transforms himself into a bug.

Stanley, Diane. Saving Sweetness. G. P. Putnam and Sons, 1996. An unusually resourceful orphan is rescued from nasty old Mrs. Sump by a sheriff.

Stevens, Janet. Tops and Bottoms. Harcourt, 1995. Brer Rabbit and Brer Bear are partners, but are they equal partners?

Stevenson, James. That’s Exactly the Way it Wasn’t. Greenwillow Books, 1991. Being told a story can be an experience being told by Grandpa and Wainey.

Stevenson, James. The Worst Person in the World at Crab Beach. Greenwillow, 1988. After meeting Miriam and her son, the worst person in the world becomes even more miserable.

Viorst, Judith. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Atheneum, 1978. Alexander experiences one of the worst days in his life when everything goes wrong.

Viorst, Judith. Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday. Aladdin Books, 1978. Alexander comes to realize that a lot can be done with a dollar after he and his money are parted.

Waber, Bernard. A Lion Named Shirley. Houghton, 1996. How embarrassing to be a lion and be named Shirley.

Wheeler, Cindy. The Emperor’s Birthday Suit. Random, 1996. Another twisted tale of an old familiar story.

Willis, Jeanne. Earth’s Weather as Explained by Professor Xargles. Dutton Books, 1993. Human behavior in different kinds of weather is explained to a classroom of extraterrestrials by Professor Xangles.

Wood, Audrey. Silly Sally. Harcourt Brace, 1992. Silly Sally makes many friends on her zany adventures of traveling through town … backwards and upside down.

Wright, Jill. The Old Woman and the Jar of Uums. G. P. Putnam, 1990. An old woman and a naughty boy must go to Willy Nilly Man to get a spell upon them lifted.

Zemke, Deborah. The Way it Happened. Houghton Mifflin, 1988. As the story of her fall from a bicycle is relayed from person to person, it becomes more humorous.

 

Books about QUESTIONING AND PROBLEM SOLVING

Alderson, Sue Ann. Ida and the Wool Smuggler. McElderry Books, 1988. Ida, stops to pet her favorite sheep, hears smugglers, and herds the sheep to safety.

Alexander, Lloyd. The House Gobbaleen. Dutton, 1995. Unhappy over his bad luck, Tooley ignores his cat’s warning and invites a greedy little man into his home.

Anno, Mitsumasa. The Fisherman and His Wife & The Four Clever Brothers. Philomel, 1993. Brothers Grimm tales combined with Mr. Fox’s bizarre interpretation.

Armstrong, Jennifer. Hugh Can Do. Crown Publishing, 1992. Hugh must find a way to pay the toll-taker at the bridge.

Arnold, Caroline. Stone Age Farmers Beside the Sea. Clarion, 1997. Scotland’s prehistoric village of Skara Brae and its discovery.

Banks, Lynne Reid. Indian In the Cupboard. Doubleday, 1980. A boy receives a plastic Indian, a cupboard, and a little key for his birthday and finds himself in an adventure.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. Mickey prepares to compete in the most important pool championship of his life with the help of his friends.

Birdseye, Tom. Airmail to the Moon. Holiday, 1988. Ora Mae sets out to find the thief of her tooth that she had put out for the tooth fairy.and send him “airmail to the moon.”

Blegvad, Lenore. Anna Banana and Me. Atheneum, 1985. Anna Banana leaves her friend fearful after telling a scary story, until he finds a feather Anna told him was magical.

Brown, Marc. Arthur Meets the President. Little, Brown and Company, 1991. When Arthur meets the president, he nervously makes note cards so he won’t forget what to say.

Brown, Marc Tolon. Arthur’s Computer Disaster. Little, Brown and Company, 1997. Arthur disobeys his mother which leads to a lesson in responsibility for one’s actions.

Bunting, Eve. Moonstick. HarperCollins, 1997. The changes with each moon is explained and describes by a young Dakota Indian boy.

Bunting, Eve. The Wednesday Surprise. Clarion, 1989. Anna and her grandmother are working on a surprise for her
father’s birthday. Anna teaches grandma to read.

Bunting, Eve. Train to Somewhere. Clarion, 1996. Marianne questions her future while on an orphan train in the 1800s.

Burgess, Melvin. Bay and The Fly Pie. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Three homeless teens stumble upon a kidnapped baby and hope to be able to exchange her for money.

Burns, Marilyn. The Greedy Triangle. Scholastic, 1994. A triangle keeps asking the shape shifter to add more lines and angles until he doesn’t know which way is up.

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. Houghton, 1967. Mike Mulligan proves that, his steam shovel is still useful.

Cameron, Eleanor. That Julia Redfern. Dutton, 1982. Family loss and other occurrences cannot dampen the spirits of the irrepressible Julia.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. What writing requires is the help supplied by friends and especially family, editors, designers, and printers.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (series). The humorous adventures of Ramona, as she deals with life and her family problems.

Clements, Andrew. Big Al. Picture Book Studios, 1988. A big, ugly fish has trouble making the friends because of his appearance until the day his appearance saves them all.

Cooney, Barbara. Miss Rumphius. Viking, 1985. Great-aunt Alice Rumphius was once a little girl who longed to visit places, and wished to make the world more beautiful.

Cushman, Karen. The Ballad of Lucy Whipple. Clarion, 1996. As her family moves from the east to west coasts, Lucy questions her future.

DeFelice, Cynthia. Weasel. Macmillian, 1990. Alone in the frontier wilderness in the winter, Nathan runs afoul of the renegade killer known as Weasel.

DeFelice, Cynthia. The Apprenticeship of Lucas Whitaker. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 1996. Lucas questions his desire of becoming a doctor.

Demi. One Grain of Rice. Scholastic, 1997. A reward of one grain of rice doubles into millions of grains of rice when a selfish raja is outwitted by a clever village girl.

Edmonds, Walter. The Matchlock Gun. Putnam, 1989. In 1756, ten-year-old Edward is determined to protect his family with an ancient Spanish gun.

Ehrlich, Amy. Parents In the Pigpen, Pigs In the Tub. Dial, 1993. The farm animals insist on moving into the house, and the family decides to move into the barn.

Fitzhugh, Louise. Harriet the Spy. Dell Publishing, 1993. Harriet has a notebook which she fills with honest jottings about everyone in her life.

Friedman, Aileen. The King’s Commissioners. Scholastic, 1994. The king learns some new ways of counting.

Gardiner, John. Stone Fox. Crowell, 1980. Willy hopes to pay backtaxes on his grandfather’s farm with the purse from a dog sled race he enters.

George, Jean Craighead. Julie of the Wolves. Harper & Row, 1972. An Eskimo girl gets lost on the Alaskan tundra and is befriended by a wolf pack.

Gillette, J. Lynett. Dinosaur Ghosts: a Mystery of Coelophysis. Dial Books, 1996. Explores the different scenarios to explain the remarkable dinosaur exploration made in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico.

Gryski, Camilla. Cat’s Cradle, Owl’s Eyes. Morrow, 1984. Presents information for making string figures and instructions for more than twenty specific figures.

Harper, Piers. Turtle Quest. Candlewick, 1997. Puzzles of the ancient Maya.

Hopkinson, Deborah. Birdie’s Lighthouse. Atheneum, 1997. A girl questions her new life as she moves to Turtle Island.

Howe, Deborah. Bunnicula. Atheneum, 1979. Though scoffed at by Harold the dog, Chester the cat tries to warn his family that their bunny must be a vampire.

Keene, Carolyn. Nancy Drew (series). Nancy challenges and solves mysteries.

Kellogg, Steven. Johnny Appleseed. Morrow, 1988. Presents the life of Johnny Appleseed, describing his love of nature.

Kneen, Maggie. When You’re Not Looking: a Storytime Counting Book. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Readers make up their own stories and to find objects from one to ten in a series of detailed, illustrations.

Konigsburg, E. L. From the Mixed-Up Files of Basil Frankweiler. Antheneum, 1967. Two children run away from their Connecticut home and go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where their ingenuity lets them live in luxury.

Lester, Julius. Sam and the Tigers. Dial Books, 1996. A little boy named Sam matches wits with several tigers that want to eat him (a retelling of Little Black Sambo).

Lionni, Leo. Little Blue and Little Yellow. Obolensky, 1959. Two globs of paint, yellow and blue, hug each other and become green.

Lionni, Leo. Swimmy. Pantheon, 1968. Swimmy, a black fish, helps a school of small red fish.

Long, Lynette. Domino Addition. Charlesbridge Publishing, 1996. Explains basic addition.

Macauley, David. The Way Things Work. Houghton, 1988. Demonstrates how the concept of one invention is linked to the concept of another.

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Viking, 1971. Six episodes in the life of Homer Price, including one about a doughnut machine on the rampage.

McCully, Emily Arnold. Popcorn at the Palace. Browndeer, 1997. An Illinois girl, with an idea in 1837 comes to London.

McDermott, Gerald. Arrow To the Sun. Viking, 1974. The Pueblo Indian myth which illustrates how the spirit of the Lord of the Sun was brought to the world of men.

McKenzie, Ellen Kindt. A Perfectly Orderly House. Holt, 1994. A woman builds a house with twenty-six rooms and keeps all her possessions in alphabetical order.

McKissack, Patricia. Flossie and the Fox. Dial, 1986. The wiley fox meets his match when he encounters a bold little girl who demands proof he is a fox.

McKissack, Patricia. Mirandy and Brother Wind. Knopf, 1988. With quick wits Mirandy catches Brother Wind for her partner in a cake walk.

Meddaugh, Susan. Tree of Birds. Houghton, 1990. Harry concludes that the tree full of Green Tufted Tropicals will not fly South without Sally, healing from a broken wing.

Norton, Mary. The Borrowers. Harcourt, 1986. Miniature people who lived in an old country house are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

O’Brien, Robert. Mrs. Frisby And the Rats Of NIMH. Atheneum, 1971. A widowed mouse visits the rats whose former imprisonment in a laboratory made them wise and long-lived.

O’Dell, Scott. Island of the Blue Dolphin. Dell, 1960. Karana, the Indian girl who lived alone for years on the island of the Blue Dolphins tells her tale.

Parrish, Peggy. Amelia Bedelia. Harper Trophy, 1992. A housekeeper causes a ruckus in the household when she attempts to make sense of some instructions.

Parrish, Peggy. Key To the Treasure. Dell Publishing, 1966. The adventures of Liza, Bill and Jed.

Peterson, John. The Littles. Scholastic, 1967. A prelude to the Littles, a family of tiny people.

Pfister, Marcus. The Rainbow Fish. North-South Books, 1992. The most beautiful fish in the ocean determines the real value of personal beauty and friendship.

Porte, Barbara Ann. Take-Along Dog. Greenwillow, 1989. Sam and Abigail must figure out how to take their dog Benton with them wherever they go because Mother does not like dogs.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1973. A newly-captured monkey named George gets into continual trouble.

Rockwell, Thomas. How To Eat Fried Worms. Watts, 1973. Two boys prove that worms can make a palatable meal.

Schwartz, Amy. Annabelle Swift, Kindergartner. Orchard, 1988. Older sister Lucy preps Annabelle for kindergarten, but Annabelle bounces back by helping another child less prepared.

Seldon, George. The Cricket in Times Square. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1987. With the help of a mouse and a cat, a cricket improves business at the newsstand run by Mario.

Shea, George. First Flight. HarperCollins, 1997. The story of Tom Tate and his conversation with the Wright Brothers.

Sobol, Donald. Encyclopedia Brown (series). The discovery of mysteries solved by Leroy “Encyclopedia” Brown.

St. George, Judith. The Brooklyn Bridge. Putnam, 1982. Text and photos describe the impossible feat of building a bridge over the East River during the nineteenth century.

Shae, George. First Flight: a Story of Tom Tate & the Wright Brothers. HarperCollins, 1996. A boy meets Orville and Wilbur Wright and witnesses the invention of the airplane in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

Stanley, Diane. Woe is Moe. Putnam, 1995. Moe’s new job in advertising brings him money, travel, and prestige.

Steig, William. Brave Irene. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1986. When her mother is ill Irene tucks her in bed and braves a snowstorm to deliver the gown to the Dutchess.

Steig, William. The Toy Brother. Harper Collins, 1996. A boy learns to get along with his brother while in a terrible predicament.

Stevensen, James. That’s Exactly the Way It Wasn’t. Greenwillow, 1991. Grandpa and Uncle Wainey disagree on every detail of this tale that they are trying to tell the grandchildren.

Tantaka, Shelley. On Board the Titanic. Hyperion/Madison, 1996. Seventeen-year-old Jack Thayer explores the Titanic and before experiencing the wreck of the giant ocean liner.

Turner, Mark. Hardy Boys (series). These books about The Hardy Boys, and the many adventures they experience while trying to solve mysterious cases.

Van Allsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Two bored and restless children find more excitement than they bargained for in a mystical jungle adventure board game.

Wagner, Jane. J. T. Dell, 1969. J. T.’s sensitivity emerges when he finds an old, one-eyed badly hurt alley cat.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Charlotte the Spider helps her friend Wilbur the pig not become the farmers dinner.

White, E. B. Trumpet of The Swan. Harper & Row, 1970. Knowing how to read and write is not enough for Louis, a voiceless Trumpeter Swan.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Little House On the Prairie. Harper & Row, 1953. Laura and her family move to Indian country in.

Wood, Audrey. Heckedy Peg. Harcourt, 1987. A mother saves her children from Heckedy Peg.

Yep, Laurence. The Man Who Tricked a Ghost. Bridgewater Books, 1993. Sung, who is not afraid of ghosts, meets one on a dark road and tricks it into revealing its secret weakness.

Yolen, Jane. Commander Toad (series). Commander Toad and his spaceship explore space.

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. How Mountains are Made. HarperCollins, 1995. How mountains are made.

 

Books involving DRAWING ON PAST KNOWLEDGE AND APPLYING IT TO NEW SITUATIONS

Ada, Alma Flor. Dear Peter Rabbit. Anthenuem Books, 1994. Letters among fairy tale characters Goldilocks, Baby Bear, Peter Rabbit, and the three Little Pigs.

Anno, Mitsumasa. The Fisherman And His Wife & The Four Clever Brothers. Philomel, 1993. Brothers Grimm tales combined with Mr. Fox’s highly bizarre adaptation of them.

Babbitt, Natalie. Tuck Everlasting. Farrar, 1975. The Tuck Family discovers that a girl and a stranger now share their secret.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. Mickey prepares to compete in the most important pool championship of his life with the help of his friends.

Blos, Joan. The Gathering of Days. Scribber, 1979. The journal of girl records daily events in her small New Hampshire farm.

Buehner, Caralyn. Fanny’s Dream. Dial Books, 1997. Fanny Agnes dreams of marrying a prince, but she decides on a local farmer instead.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. Writing requires dedication, patience, among other things.

Cleaver, Vera. Where the Lilies Bloom. Lippincott, 1969. A fourteen-year-old girl struggles to keep her family together after their father dies.

Cowcher, Helen. Rain Forest. Farrar, 1988. The creatures who live in the rain forest know that change is coming when the Machine invades their world.

Demi. One Grain of Rice. Scholastic, 1997. A reward of one grain of rice doubles day by day when a selfish raja is outwitted by a clever village girl.

dePaola, Tomie. Now One Foot, Now the Other. Putnam, 1980. When his grandfather suffers a stroke, Bobby teaches him to walk.

George, Jean Craighead. My Side of the Mountain. Dutton, 1988. A young boy relates his happenings during the year he spends living alone in the Mountains.

Gilette, J. Lynett. Dinosaur Ghosts: the Mystery of Coelophysis. Dial Books, 1996. Explores the different scenarios to explain the remarkable dinosaur exploration made in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. A young girl on a visit to her granddad feels that there is something strange going on.

Lewis, J. Patrick. Riddle-icious. Knopf Books, 1996. Try your hand at poems that generally please anyone who likes a good rhyme and riddle.

Luenn, Nancy. Nessa’s Fish. Atheneum, 1990. Nessa’s ingenuity and bravery save from poachers the fish she and her grandmother caught to feed everyone in their Eskimo camp.

Macauley, David. The Way Things Work. Houghton, 1988. Shows how the concept of one invention is linked to the concept of another.

Martin, Bill. Knots On a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. Boy-Strength-of-Blue-Horses and his grandfather reminisce about the young boy’s life.

Mathis, Sharon. The Hundred Penny Box. Puffin, 1993. Michael’s love for his great-great-aunt, who lives with them, leads them to intercede with his mother.

McKenzie, Ellen Kindt. The Perfectly Orderly House. Holt, 1994. A woman builds a house with twenty-six rooms and keeps all her possessions in alphabetical order.

McKisscack, Pat. Flossie and the Fox. Dial, 1986. A wily fox meets his match when he encounters a girl who insists upon proof that he is a fox before she is frightened.

Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. Saving Shiloh. Atheneum, 1997. A family tries to reform their neighbor’s evil ways.

O’Dell, Scott. Island of the Blue Dolphins. Dell Publishing, 1960. Karana’s story, the Indian girl lived alone for years on the island of the blue dolphins.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. After a plane crash, Brian spends time in the wilderness with only the aide of a hatchet given him by his mother.

Pfister, Marcus. Hooper. Scholastic, 1991. The account of Hooper and his mother as they search for food in the forest?

Polette, Nancy. The Hole By the Apple Tree. Morrow, 1992. Harold’s imagination takes him on a romp through the alphabet with a number of familiar storybook characters.

Serfozo, Mary. What’s What? A Guessing Game. McElderry Books, 1996. Illustrations and text provide examples of opposites.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. The love between a boy and a tree continues into his old age.

Speare, Elizabeth. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. Houghton, 1958. A girl’s defiance against bigotry climaxes in a terrifying witch hunt and trial.

Steig, William. The Toy Brother. HarperCollins, 1996. A boy comes to learn love his brother.

Stevens, Janet. Tops and Bottoms. Harcourt, 1995. Hare turns his luck around by striking a deal with the rich and lazy bear.

Swope, Sam. Araboolies of Liberty Street. Potter, 1989. The kids of Liberty Street help Araboolies when petty General Pinch orders them to move.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Two bored and restless children find more than they bargained for.

Warner, Gertrude Chandler. The Boxcar Children (series). Four orphans, set up housekeeping in an old boxcar.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Little House on the Prairie. Harper & Row, 1953. Laura and her family move to Indian country.

Yolen, Jane. Beneath the Ghost Moon. Little, Brown and Company, 1994. Beneath the moon, mice battle destructive creepy-crawlies to protect their farmyard home.

 

Books about RISK TAKING

Banks, Lynn Reid. Indian In the Cupboard. Doubleday, 1980. After he receives a plastic Indian, a cupboard, and a key for his birthday a nine-year-old boy, finds he’s involved in an adventure when the Indian comes to life.

Blos, Joan. Nellie Bly’s Monkey. Morrow Junior Books, 1996. Traveling worldwide with his master, McGinty the monkey finally settles in New York at the Menagerie.

Brett, Jan. Armadillo Rodeo. G. P. Putnam, 1995. Although most armadillos are happy scratching and eating, Bo longs for adventure.

Brown, Don. Alice Ramsey’s Grand Adventure. Houghton Mifflin, 1997. The story of the first woman to make a cross-country journey from N.Y. to San Francisco.

Byers, Betsy. The Golly Sisters Ride Again. HarperCollins, 1994. As they travel with their traveling show, two sisters share many, many adventures.

Calabrese, Keith and Medina, Juana. Lena’s Shoes Are Nervous.

Cheech, Sharon. Chasing Redbird. HarperCollins, 1997. While clearing a mysterious trail at her family’s farm in Kentucky, several family secrets and self truths are revealed to Zinnie Taylor.

Cherry, Lynne. The Armadillo for Amarillo. Gulliver Green Book, 1994. While sightseeing on a wandering trip, an armadillo explores the wildlife and cities of Texas.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (series). Ramona, an eight-year-old, deals with life and her family problems in a humorous way.

Cushman, Karen. The Ballad of Lucy Whipple. Clarion Books, 1996. In 1849, Lucy is distraught when her mother moves the family from Massachusetts to a California town.

Driscoll, Laura. The Bravest Cat! Grosset, 1997. Returning to a burning building, a cat tries to save her kittens.

Edwards, Pamela Duncal. Some Smug Slug. HarperCollins, 1996. Sometimes it isn’t smart ignoring everyone’s advice and doing your own thing.

Fitzhugh, Louise. Harriet the Spy. Dell Publishing, 1964. Harriet has a secret notebook, which she fills with honest jottings about her parents, her classmates, and her neighbors.

Fleischman, Sid. Chancy and the Grand Rascal. Little, Brown and Company, 1966. Chancy and the Grand Rascal join together on a journey to find his kin.

French, Fiona. Little Inchkin. Dial, 1994. Size has nothing to do with bravery.

Gallaz, Christopher. Rose Blanche. Creative Education, 1985. A young German girl curiosity leads her to follow a truck through her town where she finds a concentration camp. While helping to feed those captive, she is killed by soldiers.

George, Jean Craighead. Julie. HarperCollins, 1994. Trying to save the wolves of the Arctic, Julie returns to her father’s Eskimo village.

George, Jean Craighead. Julie of the Wolves. Harper & Row, 1972. When she becomes lost in the Alaskan tundra, Julie is befriended by a pack of wolves.

Gering, Laura. The Seven Ravens. Harper Collins, 1994. A young girl rescues her brothers.

Hahn, Mary Downing. The Gentleman Outlaw and Me-Eli: A Story of the Old West. Clarion, 1996. Disguised as a boy, Eliza travels to Colorado in search of her missing father.

Henkes, Kevin. Sheila Rae, the Brave.

Hesse, Karen. The Music of Dolphins. Scholastic, 1996. Raised by dolphins, a young girl learns what it means to be human.

Hiss, Karen. Out of the Dust. Scholastic, 1997. One year in the life of a 14 year old during the Depression.

Hoffman, Mary. Amazing Grace. Dial Books, 1991. An African American convinced that she can not play Peter Pan in the school play realizes that she can do anything she sets her mind to accomplish.

Hopkinson, Deborah. Birdie’s Lighthouse. Athenum, 1997. The journal of a girl who moves from the east to west coast in 1855.

Howard, Ellen. A Different Kind of Courage. Atheneum, 1996. A journey to America, and family separation.

Isaacs, Anne. Swamp Angel. Dutton Children’s Books, 1994. A town is saved from the jaws of death as a woodswoman in Tennessee single-handedly battled the beast known as Thundering Tarnation.

Jacques, Brian. Martin the Warrior. Philomel, 1994. The adventures of a young mouse warrior.

Kehret, Peg. Earthquake Terror. Dutton Books, 1996. After a horrible earthquake, a young man struggle to keep his family safe and alive until help can find them.

Kimmel, Eric A. Hershell and the Hanukkah Goblins. Holiday Books, 1989. Hershell risks his life to save the town from the terrible goblins.

Kurtz, Jane. Trouble. Harcourt Brace, 1997. The board game that was supposed to keep a young goatherd busy is traded, and the boys’ father is not to pleased.

Lasky, Kathryn. The Solo. Macmillan, 1994. Dancing solo takes a lot of courage, especially if you may not have the talent.

Lester, Henry. John Henry. Dial Books, 1994. To prove a man’s worth, a legendary African American races against a steam drill.

London, Jonathan. Froggie Learns to Swim.

Lowell, Susan. Little Red Cowboy Hat. Holt, 1997. A Southwestern version of “Little Red Riding Hood.”

Maguire, Gregory. Seven Spiders Spinning. Clarion, 1944. An a local town, seven prehistoric spiders frozen in ice for thousands of years unite two rival clubs.

McGhee, Holly M. Come with Me.

McKissack, Pat. A Picture of Freedom: a Diary of Clotee… Scholastic Inc., 1997. In a dairy of her life, a slave girl reveals how she hid her ability to read and write and struggled with the ideas of escape slavery.

Medearis, Angela Shelf. The Ghost of Sifty Sifty Sam. Scholastic, 1997. What would it take to stay in a house with a hungry ghost?

Milne, A. A. Winnie the Pooh. Dutton, 1988. The adventures of Pooh, Piglet, Owl, Tigger and Eeyore.

Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. Alice In-Between. Jean Karl Book, 1994. When Alice reached the age of thirteen she felt in-between. Her age was too much to be a child and too less to be an adult.

Paulsen, Gary. Brian’s Winter. Dell Publishing, 1996. If not for his rescue, this book would have portrayed what might have happened to Brian if left alone in the wilderness during the winter months.

Pinkney, Brian. The Adventures of Sparowboy. Simon & Schuster, 1997. A boy can fly and save his favorite comic hero.

Pinkney, Andrea. Bill Pickett: Rodeo-Ridin’ Cowboy. Harcourt, 1996. The adventures and accomplishment of the son of a former slave who became a star.

Reynolds, Aaron. Creepy Pair of Underwear.

Scieszka, Jon. The Time Warp Trio (series) Viking. Time travel and adventures of three boys.

Teague, Mark. The Secret Shortcut. Scholastic, 1996. Two boys decide to take a shortcut to school.

Willis, Patricia. Danger Along the Ohio. Clarion, 1997. Lost in the Ohio River Valley in 1793, Clare and her brother try to survive.

Woodruff, Elvira. The Magnificent Mammy Maker. Scholastic Inc., 1994. When everyone in his family achieves recognition for something they accomplished, Andy feels compelled to do something special.

Yashima, Taro. Crow Boy. Viking, 1994. A story of a boy in a Japanese village school who was dishonored by classmates until the instructor shows them that Crow Boy has more to offer.

Yolen, Jane. Beneath the Ghost Moon. Little, Brown and Company, 1994. Beneath the moon, mice battle nasty creepy-crawlies to protect their farmyard home.

 

Books about USING ALL YOUR SENSES

Aliki. My Five Senses. Crowell, 1989. When discovering the world through her five senses a child relates her feelings.

Appelt, Kathi. Bayou Lullaby. Morrow, 1995. A book which uses a colorful good-night wish to a girl from the bayou.

Armstrong, Jennifer. Hugh Can Do. Crown, 1992. Hugh needs to pay the toll-maker at the bridge so he can go to the city and seek his fortune.

Aylesworth, Jim. Wake Up, Little Children: a Rise-and-shine Rhyme. Antheneum, 1996. When a child awakes, a song helps them to celebrate the birth of a new day.

Berry, James. Rough Sketch Beginning. Harcourt, 1996. An artist’s inner thoughts are expressed through a descriptive poem.

Borden, Louise. The Little Ships: the Heroic Rescue at Dunkirk in World War II. McElderry, 1997. To help trapped British troops escape the Nazi soldiers, an English girl and her father try daring attempts.

Byars, Betsy Cromer. The Summer Of the Swans. Viking, 1970. When her mentally challenged brother disappears, a teen-age girl learns new insight into herself and her family.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. What does it take to be an author? Many supportive friends and people.

De Zutter, Hank. Who Says a Dog Says Bow-Wow. Doubleday, 1993. Different languages are explored while using animal sounds.

Fleischman, Sid. The Whipping Boy. ABC-Clio, 1989. After trading places, the friendship between a bratty prince and a whipping boy becomes stronger with each dangerous adventure.

George, Jean Craighead. To Climb a Waterfall. Philomel, 1995. If you’ve ever wondered what it is like to climb a waterfall this book will help you.

Gliori, Debi, illus. Poems Go Clang! Candlewick, 1997. Poetry that encourages loud participation.

Greene, Rhonda G. Barnyard Song. Atheneum, 1997. When a bee spreads a cold, the barnyard sounds are changed.

Hathorn, Elizabeth. The Wonder Thing. Houghton Mifflin Company, 1996. “The wonder thing” that is all around us is appreciated more with the help of Libby Hathorn and Peter Goldthorpe.

Heller, Ruth. Behind the Mask: a Book of Prepositions. Grosset & Dunlop, 1995. Exploring propositions and how they are used is described in this book with the help of a rhyming text.

Hutchins, Pat. The Shrinking Mouse. Greenwillow, 1997. Noticing the difference in objects by their own location is described by four animal friends.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. Something is not quite right, but a girl visiting her granddad can’t figure it out.

Lewin, Ted. Fair. Greenwillow, 1997. The sights, smells and tastes of a country fair.

Lobel, Anita. Away From Home. Morrow, 1994. In an alliterative fashion, this book uses the names of boys and exotic places to help learn the alphabet.

Locker, Thomas. Where the River Begins. Dial, 1984. To discover where the river flowing by their home gets its source, a grandfather and two boys go camping.

London, Jonathan. Let the Lynx Come In. Candlewick Press, 1996. Climbing on the back of a lynx, a young boy explores many adventures while his father sleeps.

MacLachlin, Patricia. All the Places to Love. HarperCollins, 1994. The nearby countryside and his grandfather’s farm are just a few things described by a boy.

McMillan, Bruce. Sense Suspense. Scholastic, 1994. Photographs, and readers using their senses.

Markle, Sandra. Outside and Inside Sharks. Atheneum, 1996. What are sharks like inside and outside. Come along for the exploration.

Martin, Bill. Knots On a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. Precious memories of his youth are shared between a grandfather and an Indian boy.

McGraw, Eloise. The Moorchild. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Attempting to find her true identity a changeling searches for the human child whose life she was filling.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. With the help of only a hatchet given to him by his mother, a boy survives several days in the wilderness.

Pfeffer, Wendy. A Log’s Life. Simon and Schuster, 1997. A tree is described through this books introduction.

Pilkey, Dav. Dog Breath. Blue Sky Press, 1994. The Tosis family plans to give their bad breathed dog Hally away until she proves to be a great watchdog.

Pilkey, Dav. Kat Kong. Harcourt, 1993. With the help of cat and mouse characters, the story of King Kong is revised in this colorful presentation.

Rawls, Wilson. Where the Red Fern Grows. Bantam, 1981. To create the finest hunting team it takes Old Dan’s brawl, Little Ann’s brains and Billy’s will to train them.

Say, Allen. Emma’s Rug. Houghton Mifflin, 1996. When the rug is destroyed that inspires a young artist, she learns to use her creativity.

Schaefer, Carole Lexa. The Squiggle. Crown Publishers, 1996. A girls imagination with a string helps her to create many different shapes and designs.

Schertle, Alice. Advice For a Frog. Lothrop, Lee and Shepard, 1996. Animals are explained with the help of a collection of poems.

Serfozo, Mary. What’s What: A Guessing Game. McElderry Books, 1996. Examples of opposites are described in rhyming text.

Silverstein, Shel. The Giving Tree. Harper & Row, 1964. With age and time, the love shared between a boy and a tree continues.

Speare, Elizabeth. The Sign of the Beaver. Houghton, 1983. Until taught by the Indians, a local boy becomes hard pressed while protecting his family’s wilderness home.

Tresselt, Alvin. Autumn Harvest. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1951. The autumn season is colorfully described by many illustrations and a simple text.

Tresselt, Alvin. Wake Up, City. Lothrop, Lee and Shepard, 1990. As morning arrives in the city a description of many things is given.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Exciting adventure awaits two bored children who are left alone for an afternoon.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. A spider decides to help Wilbur the pig escape certain death on a farm full of talking animals.

White, E. B. The Trumpet Of the Swan. Harper & Row, 1970. A stolen trumpet is played by a voiceless swan who finds that he must travel far from his wilderness home.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Little House on the Prairie. Harper & Row, 1953. Moving to Kansas proves very adventurous for a girl named Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Wolff, Patricia Rae. The Toll-Bridge Troll. Harcourt, 1995. A boy named Trigg must outwit a troll with his riddles to cross the bridge on his way to school.

Wood, Audrey. The Flying Dragon Room. Blue Sky Press, 1996. Patrick builds a fantasy world for himself using the magic tools from Mrs. Jenkins.

Woodtor, Dee Parmer. Big Meeting. Atheneum, 1996. A family reunion at the A. M. E. Church in the South is described for all to enjoy.

Yashima, Taro. Crow Boy. Viking, 1983. Until the teacher brings out the true personality of Crow Boy the whole class ignores him.

Young, Ed. Voices of the Heart. Scholastic, 1997. Chinese characters that describe feelings or emotions.

 

Books about INGENUITY, ORIGINALITY, INSIGHTFULNESS, CREATIVITY

Adler, David. A Picture Book of Helen Keller. Holiday House, 1990. A biography of the woman who was both blind and deaf and overcame those handicaps.

Anno, Mitsumasa. The Fisherman and His Wife & The Four Clever Brothers. Philomel, 1993. Brothers Grimm tales combined with Mr. Fox’s strange interpretation.

Armstrong, Jennifer. Hugh Can Do. Crown Publishers, 1992. Hugh must find a way to pay the toll-taker at the bridge.

Auch, Mary Jane. Eggs Marks the Spot. Holiday House, 1996. Pauline the hen lays eggs with the image of what she sees to capture the thief who has stolen a famous painting.

Bauer, Joan. Sticks. Bantam Doubleday, 1996. Mickey prepares to compete in the most important pool championship of his life, with the assistance of his friends.

Berry, James. Rough Sketch Beginning. Harcourt, 1996. A poem about an artists’ thoughts and visions as he prepares a sketch for a painting with the final work on a fold-out page.

Birdseye, Tom. Airmail to the Moon. Holiday, 1988. Ora Mae sets out to find the thief who stole the tooth meant from the tooth fairy and send him “airmail to the moon.”

Blume, Judy. Freckle Juice. Four Winds, 1985. Andrew wants freckles and he buys Sharon’s freckle recipe.

Brett, Jan. The Mitten. Mulberry, 1989. Tale about a lost mitten which becomes the shelter for many animals.

Brooke, William. Teller of Tales. HarperCollins, 1994. Traditional tales told in an untraditional way.

Browne, Eileen. No Problem. Candlewick Press, 1993. Mouse’s friends take turns putting together the parts that come in a box as a birthday gift.

Burns, Marilyn. The Greedy Triangle. Scholastic, 1994. A triangle keeps asking the shape shifter to add more lines and angles until it doesn’t know which end is up.

Charlip, Remy. Arm In Arm. Tricycle Press, 1997. Endless tales of verse, tongue twisters, riddles and plays on words.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. The help supplied by friends, family, editors, and printers, as well as dedication and patience are what writing requires.

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona (series). The adventures of Ramona, as she deals with life.

Clement, Rod. Just Another Ordinary Day. HarperCollins, 1997. Described as an ordinary day, the illustrations tell a different story.

Cowan, Catherine. My Life With the Wave. Lothrop, 1997. A child befriends a wave at the seashore.

Cyrus, Kurt. Tangle Town. Farrar, 1997. An ordinary day in an extraordinary town with twisted words and their meanings.

Demi. Buddha Stories. Holt, 1997. The morals and wisdom of Buddha, beautifully illustrated and told.

Demi. One Grain of Rice. Scholastic, 1997. A reward of one grain of rice doubles into millions of grains of rice when an egotistical raja is outwitted by a clever village girl.

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Dinorella: A Prehistoric Fairytale. Hyperion, 1997. An alliterative tale of the classic Cinderella.

Ehrlich, Amy. Parents In the Pigpen, Pigs In the Tub. Dial, 1993. The farm animals insist on moving into the house, so the family decides to move to the barn.

Fair, Sylvia. The Bedspread. Morrow, 1982. Two sisters embroider the house of their childhood at either end of a
bedspread, and each remembers it with results that surprise them.

Fleischman, Sid. The Whipping Boy. ABC-Clio, 1989. A bratty prince and his whipping boy have many escapades when they trade places after becoming entangled with dangerous outlaws.

Fleischman, Paul. Shadow Play. Harper & Row, 1990. Puppet show of “Beauty and the Beast.”

Florian, Douglas. In the Swim: Poems and Paintings. Harcourt, 1997. Humorous poems about sea creatures.

Garland, Michael. Dinner at Magritte’s. Dutton, 1995. A day spend with surrealist artists Rene Margritte and Salvador Dali.

Handford, Martin. Where’s Waldo? Little, Brown and Company, 1987. The reader follows Waldo as he hikes around the world.

Hayes, Joe. A Spoon for Every Bite. Orchard Books, 1996. A poor husband and wife ask their neighbor to be godfather of their child, and they prey upon him and trick him out of his fortune.

Heller, Ruth. Behind the Mask: a Book about Prepositions. Grosset & Dunlop, 1995. Explores the subject of prepositions and how to use them.

Howe, James. There’s a Monster Under My Bed. Atheneum, 1986. Simon is positive that there are monsters under his bed in the night.

Isaacs, Anne. Swamp Angel. Dutton, 1994. Angelica Longrider who single-handedly saves settlers from the jaws of a bear.

Janulewitz, Mike. Yikes! Your Body, Up Close! Revealing book of microphotography.

Jeunnesse, Gallimard. The Tree. Scholastic, 1989. Children can watch a chestnut seed sprout roots and grow into a tree that blossoms and changes through the seasons.

Johnston, Tony. The Iguana Brothers. Scholastic, 1995. The Iguana brothers eat flowers, pretend to be dinosaurs, and discover that they can be best friends.

Keller, Debra. The Trouble With Mister. Chronicle Books, 1995. Alex finds another way to have the dog he’s always wanted. Even though his parents think a dog troublesome.

Kneen, Maggie. When You’re Not Looking: a Storytime Counting Book. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Readers make up their own stories and find objects from one to ten in a series of detailed illustrations.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. A girl on her visit to her granddad feels that there is something strange going on.

Lester, Julius. Sam and the Tigers. Dial Books, 1996. A boy named Sam matches wits with several tigers that want to eat him (a retelling of Little Black Sambo).

Lewis, J. Patrick. Riddle-icious. Knopf Books, 1996. Try your hand at poems that will generally please anyone who likes a good rhyme and riddle.

Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking. Viking, 1978. Pippi, a wonder girl, lives alone and she does many things such as tying brushes to her feet and skating in suds to scrub a floor.

Lobel, Anita. Away From Home. Morrow, 1994. Runs through the alphabet using boys’ names and the names of exotic places in alliterative fashion.

Locker, Thomas. Waterdance. Harcourt, 1997. Water speaks of its existence.

Luenn, Nancy. Nessa’s Fish. Atheneum, 1990. Nessa’s ingenuity save from animal poachers the fish she and her grandmother caught.

Lyne, Alice A. My Name Is… Whispering Coyote, 1997. Rhyme with animals and people in an original way.

MacDonald, Suse. Peck Slither and Slide. Harcourt Brace, 1997. Visual puzzles depicting animals and their behavior.

Martin, Bill. Barn Dance! Holt, 1986. Unusual barn dance on a night of full moon.

Martin, Bill. Knots On a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. Boy-Strength-of-Blue-Horses and his grandfather reminisce about the young boy’s life.

Martin, David. Little Chicken Chicken. Candlewick Press, 1996. After a chicken uses string and stones to entertain her friends the other chickens try to see the world from her point of view.

Mayer, Mercer. There’s a Nightmare In My Closet. Dial, 1968. A small boy will not to be frightened by his nightmare and finds that the Nightmare is a truly cowardly crybaby.

McDermott, Gerald. Arrow To the Sun: A Pueblo Indian Tale. Viking, 1974. The Pueblo Indian myth which explains how the spirit of the Lord of the Sun was brought to the world of men.

McKenzie, Ellen Kindt. A Perfectly Orderly House. Holt, 1994. A woman builds a house with twenty-six rooms and keeps her possessions in alphabetical order.

Parish, Herman. Bravo, Amelia Bedelia. Greenwillow Books, 1997. When Amelia is sent to pick up the guest conductor, her standard confusion causes quite an uproar at the school concert.

Paterson, Katherine. The Great Gilly Hopkins. Crowell, 1978. A foster child tries to cope with her longings and fears as she plots against everyone who tries to be friendly.

Paulsen, Gary. Hatchet. Bradbury, 1987. After a plane crash, Brian spends time in the wilderness, with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother.

Pelletier, David. The Graphic Alphabet. Orchard Books, 1996. This alphabet is for all those who mastered their ABC’s.

Peterson, Julienne. Caterina, the Clever Farm Girl. Dial, 1996. In this Tuscan folktale, a farmers daughter becomes queen by charming the king with her wit and ingenuity.

Pfeffer, Wendy. A Log’s Life. Simon and Schuster, 1997. The beginning of the life of a tree.

Pfister, Marcus. Dazzle the Dinosaur. Scholastic, 1994. Dazzle is the most spectacular dinosaur ever.

Polette, Nancy. The Hole By the Apple Tree. Morrow, 1992. Harold’s imagination takes him on an adventure romp.

Priceman, Marjorie. How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World. Random House, 1994. The reader is led around the world to gather the ingredients for making an apple pie.

Say, Allen. Emma’s Rug. Houghton Mifflin, 1996. An artist finds that her creativity comes from within.

Schaefer, Carole Lexa. The Squiggle. Crown Publishers, 1996. A young girl finds a piece of string which her imagination turns into a dragon’s tail, an acrobat, a storm cloud, and more.

Schnur, Steven. Autumn: An Alphabet Acrostic. Clarion, 1997. Seasons of the year in an acrostic format.

Schertle, Alice. Advice For a Frog. Lothrop, 1995. A collection of poems about animals.

Schotter, Roni. Nothing Ever Happens on 90th Street. Orchard Books, 1997. While Eva sits on her stoop trying to complete a school assignment, she gets a great deal of advice and action.

Shannon, George. Tomorrow’s Alphabet. Greenwillow, 1995. Think ahead, and the alphabet will be told.

Shea, George. First Flight: a Story of Tom Tate & the Wright Brothers. HarperCollins, 1996. A boy meets Orville and Wilbur Wright and witnesses the invention of the airplane in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

Slobodika, Esphyr. Caps For Sale. Young Scott Books, 1968. The monkeys steal from the peddler while he is asleep.

Speare, Elizabeth. The Sign of the Beaver. Houghton, 1983. Left alone to guard the family’s wilderness home, a boy only barely survives until local Indians teach him their skills.

Turner, Ann. Shaker Hearts. HarperCollins, 1997. A celebration of the Shakers and their way of life.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Bad Day at Riverbend. Houghton Mifflin, 1995. When Sheriff Hardy investigates the village of Riverbend, he finds that the village has become part of a child’s coloring book.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. Two bored and restless children find more excitement than they
bargained for in a jungle board game.

Van Allsburg, Chris. The Mysteries of Harris Burdick. Houghton Mifflin, 1984. Readers make up their own stories from loosely related drawings.

Virost, Judith. The Alphabet From Z to A: With Much Confusion on the Way. Macmillan, 1994. Verses running backward through the alphabet.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. Charlotte the spider helps Wilbur the pig not to be the farmers’ dinner.

Willard, Nancy. The Magic Cornfield. Harcourt, 1997. A magic mailbox, a cornfield, and appropriate messages with unique stamps.

Wolff, Patricia Rae. The Toll-Bridge Troll. Harcourt, 1995. A troll tries to block Trigg from crossing the bridge only to be outwitted by the boy’s riddles.

Wood, Audrey. The Flying Dragon Room. Blue Sky Press, 1996. With the help of Mrs. Jenkins, Patrick builds a fantasy world of his own.

Wood, Audrey. Heckedy Peg. Harcourt, 1987. A mother saves her seven children from Heckedy Peg.

 

Books about WONDERMENT, INQUISITIVENESS, CURIOSITY & THE ENJOYMENT OF PROBLEM SOLVING—A SENSE OF EFFICACY AS A THINKER

Appelt, Kathi. Bayou Lullaby. Morrow, 1995. A Cajun girl is wished good-night in this colorful poem book.

Aylesworth, Jim. Wake Up, Little Children: A Rise-And-Shine Rhyme. Antheneum, 1996. A waking daybreak is described in song.

Banks, Lynne R. Indian In the Cupboard. Doubleday, 1980. A boy, a cupboard, an Indian and a magical key unlock many adventures.

Base, Graema. The Sign Of the Seahorse. Abram’s, Inc., 1995. A land of fantasy with sand and shells lies beneath the wind and waves.

Berry, James. Rough Sketch Drawing. Harcourt Brace, 1996. Artist’s though and visions.

Brett, Jan. Armadillo Rodeo. Putnam, 1995. An adventurous armadillo doesn’t find joy in the common everyday routine of the armadillo’s life.

Burningham, John. Cloudland. Crown Publishers, 1996. An adventure in Cloudland proves to be exciting for Albert, but he still misses his parents.

Christelow, Eileen. What Do Authors Do? Clarion, 1995. How do you become an author? With the help of many supportive friends and people.

Cole, Joanna. The Magic School Bus (series). Explore unseen worlds of science and adventure with the help of Ms. Frizzel and her Magic School Bus.

Collier, Mary Jo. The King’s Giraffe. Simon & Schuster, 1996. The gift, a giraffe, is sent to the pasha of Egypt along with its keeper which keeps the townspeople in awe and amazement by such a beautiful creature.

Cowan, Catherine. My Life With the Wave. Loethrow, Lee and Sheperd, 1997. A child’s wonderment regarding a wave.

Cushman, Karen. The Ballad of Lucy Whipple. Clarion Books, 1996. A family who moves to a small California mining town is described by a twelve-year-old girl named Lucy.

DeGross, Monalisa. Donavan’s Word Jar. HarperCollins, 1994. Donavan uses his creativity in dealing with his full word jar.

Dionetti, Michelle. Painting the Wind. Little, Brown & Co., 1996. The housekeeper’s daughter is entranced by Van Gogh’s works.

Eastman, P. D. Are You My Mother? Random House, 1980. Hatching from an egg to find himself alone a chick asked all the animals if they are his mother.

Ehrlich, Amy. Parents In the Pigpen, Pigs In the Tub. Dial, 1993. The farm animals are tired of the same old routine, so they devise a plan to trade places with the humans on their farm.

Fleischman, Paul. Shadow Play. Harper & Row, 1990. While visiting a fair, a young boy becomes enthralled with a shadow play.

Florian, Douglas. In the Swim. Harcourt Brace, 1997. Funny Poems inspiring curiosity in undersea creatures.

Garland, Michael. Dinner at Magritte’s. Dutton Children’s, 1995. Peter is curious about art.

Geisert, Arthur. The Etcher’s Studio. Houghton, 1997. A boy and his grandfather and the studio.

Guarino, Deborah. Is Your Mama a Llama? Scholastic, 1989. Lloyd is determined to find the animal who has a Llama as a Mama so he asks every animal he meets.

Handford, Martin. Where’s Waldo? Little, Brown and Company, 1987. From illustrations of different scenes of crowded people you are to find Waldo.

Heller, Ruth. Behind the Mask: a Book of Prepositions. Grosset, 1994. Prepositions and how they are used is explained in rhyming text

Johnson, Jinny. Simon and Schuster Children’s Guide to Birds. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Explaining birds from around the world this book gives an ideal introduction.

Juster, Barbara. Echoes for the Eye. HarperCollin, 1996. A collection of nature poetry.

Kneen, Maggie. When You’re Not Looking: A Storytime Counting Book. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Using fancy illustrations the readers are encouraged to make up stories and find objects.

Lauber, Patricia. How Dinosaurs Came To Be. Simon & Schuster, 1996. Explore the world of the dinosaur as they grunt and growl, waddle and scuttle in search of food to eat.

Legge, David. Bamboozled. Scholastic, 1994. Something is not quite right, but a little girl on her visit to her grandad’s can’t figure it out.

Lester, Julius. Sam and the Tigers. Dial Books, 1996. A boy named Sam outwits tigers who are trying to eat him in this revised version of Little Black Sambo.

Locker, Thomas. Water Dance. Harcout Brace, 1997. All about Water.

London, Jonathan. Let the Lynx Come In. Candlewick Press, 1996. A boy climbs onto a lynx back for many adventures while his father sleeps.

Macaulay, David. The Way Things Work. Houghton, 1988. Describes how each machine is connected together to form the world of machinery.

Markle, Sandra. Outside and Inside Sharks. Atheneum, 1996. Have you ever wondered what a shark looks like inside and outside?

Martin, Bill. Knots On a Counting Rope. Holt, 1987. A boy’s past is remembered through the eyes of his grandfather and an Indian boy.

McCloskey, Robert. Blueberries for Sal. Viking, 1948. Two children came to the blueberry patch, one to pick berries and one to eat them.

McCloskey, Robert. One Morning in Maine. Viking, 1980. A family experiences many things on one day in Maine.

McCloskey, Robert. Time of Wonder. Puffin, 1977. The Maine coast is explored and explained by two children spending the summer there.

Parish, Herman. Bravo, Amelia Bedelia. Greenwillow Books, 1997. Amelia’s hilarious antics aren’t far behind, especially when she is sent to pick up the guest conductor for the school concert.

Paulsen, Gary. The River. Delacorte, 1991. A fifteen-year-old boy named Brian is asked to repeat his experience of living in the wild to help scientists learn about survival.

Petty, Kate. I Didn’t Know That Some Trains Run on Water. Copper Beach, 1997. Amazing facts about the rail transportation.

Pfeffer, Wendy. A Log’s Life. Simon and Schuster, 1997. A tree is described in detailed introduction.

Polette, Nancy. The Hole By the Apple Tree. Morrow, 1992. Numerous storybook characters take Harold on an imaginary adventure through the alphabet.

Rey, H. A. Curious George. Houghton, 1969. Many adventures are taken by George, the newly-captured monkey with his unsatiable curiosity.

Salten, Felix. Bambi. Simon & Schuster, 1928. A young deer learns many lessons about life while becoming a beautiful stag.

Say, Allen. Emma’s Rug. Houghton Mifflin, 1996. When a rug used for inspiration by a young artist is destroyed, she must learn to depend on her own creativity.

Shea, Pegi Dietz. New Moon. Boyd’s Mill Press, 1996. On a dark winter night a child searches for the moon.

Simon, Seymour. Strange Mysteries From Around the World. Morrow, 1997. True, strange, and still unexplained.

Spyri, Johanna. Heidi. Grosset & Dunlop, 1983. Living high in the Swiss mountains a young girl and her grandfather have many adventures.

Tresselt, Alvin. Wake Up, City! Lothrop, 1990. As morning arrives in the city many things begin to happen.

Updike, David. An Autumn Tale. Pippin Press, 1988. A Halloween prank earns Homer access to a tree celebration.

VanAllsburg, Chris. Jumanji. Houghton, 1981. An exciting adventures awaits two bored children left alone for an afternoon.

VanAllsburg, Chris. The Polar Express. Houghton, 1985. A boy receives a special gift from Santa Claus when he is taken by a magical train on Christmas Eve.

Watson, Richard Jesse. Tom Thumb. Harcourt, 1989. The honor of becoming the smallest Knight of the Round Table is Tom Thumb’s reward.

White, E. B. Charlotte’s Web. Harper & Row, 1980. A spider decides to help Wilbur the pig escape certain death on a farm full of talking animals.

Woodtor, Dee Parmer. Big Meeting. Atheneum, 1996. A family reunion at the A. M. E. Church in the South is described for all to enjoy.

Yolen, Jane. Welcome to the Sea of Sand. G. P. Putnam and Sons, 1996. Welcome to the extraordinary world of the desert in colorful dramatic pictures.